IWX Coop awards for 2008

 

 

Eau Claire, MI 40 year award

Eau Claire, MI 40 year length of service award   Eau Claire, MI 40 year length of service award

Eau Claire, MI 40 year length of service award   Mr. Herbert Teichman has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service in Eau Claire, MI since 1968. Mr. Teichman’s father began the weather observing site in 1923. Daily observations include rainfall and snowfall water equivalent along with maximum and minimum temperatures.  The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Mr. Teichman remembers as a kid taking weather observations every day right before supper and then talking about the observation and the day’s weather while eating supper. He is highly tuned into the weather since he owns a 450+ acre fruit tree farm. “The fruit business is highly governed by the weather”, Mr. Teichman said. “Rainfall, drought, heat, and frost are just some of the factors that affect our many fruit trees”, he said. His fruit tree business includes apples, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, pears, and plums. Mr. Teichman is very diligent in his weather observations taking neat, legible, and accurate observations and even has all of his weather records back to the beginning. He is very proud of his 40 year length of service award; but also wanted to mention that he cannot take all of the credit. His family helps out. His wife helps him in entering his weather observations and figuring out useful statistics. A daughter of Mr. Teichman’s helps paint the wooden shelter that houses the maximum and minimum thermometers. Since Mr. Teichman’s father…this has truly been a family affair. Back in July 1999, Mr. Teichman recorded a high of 103 degrees. He has recorded 5 months with maximum temperatures 100+.  On the other end of the temperature spectrum…he has recorded 2 months with -20 degrees or colder. In January 1972 he recorded a low temperature of -21 degrees and in January 1994 he recorded -22 degrees. In August 2007 he recorded 12.18 inches of rainfall for his fruit trees. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Teichman for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. Pictured is Mr. Teichman accepting his 40 year length of service award.

 

Laporte, IN 25 year award

25 year award for Laporte    Mr. Todd Taylor and his co-workers at the Laporte Waterworks have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1983. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall and water equivalent of snowfall. They also have a raingage that takes precipitation measurements every 15 minutes. In June 1988 a high temperature of 101 degrees was recorded. Every July from 1983 to 2008, except for three of them, Mr. Taylor and co-workers have recorded a high temperature of 90+ degrees. The coldest temperature that they have recorded is -23 degrees in January of 1985 and January 1994. In September of 2008 they recorded 15.29 inches of rain and the highest monthly snowfall total that they have recorded is 48.4 inches in December 2000. The largest snowdepth that they have measured was 24 inches in February of 1985. These observations are part of the continuous weather record reported at Laporte, IN for the National Weather Service since 1894.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area...as well as helping to document the climate of northwestern Indiana. Pictured is Mr. Taylor accepting the 25 year award for the Laporte Waterworks plant.

 

Goshen, IN 10 year award

Goshen, IN 10 year award   Mr. Leland Shaum and his wife, Sharon, have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service (NWS) since 1998. Mr. Shaum remembers seeing an ad in the local paper from the NWS that the weather equipment at the Goshen College needed to be moved. He has always been interested in the weather and was at the time taking weather observations on his own, so he decided to contact the NWS and volunteer to help out his country and community. Precipitation along with high and low temperatures are recorded each day. Their observations are helping to continue weather observations at Goshen, IN for the National Weather Service since 1914. They are proudly retaining the station’s weather records back to 1915. In July 1999 they recorded a high of 98 degrees. Also in that same year in January…they recorded a low temperature of -19 degrees. On one day in July 2006 they remember their rain gage filling up 3 times and measuring the water in it for a 4th time within a single rain event. In August of 2007 they recorded a total of 12.83 inches of rainfall. In December of 2000 they recorded a monthly total of 35.9 inches of snowfall. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. & Mrs. Shaum along with their children for their continued dedication in taking weather observations. Pictured are Mr. & Mrs. Shaum with their son Thaddaeus accepting their 10 year award.

 

Portland, IN 50 year award

Portland, IN 50 year award    The Portland Sewage Plant has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service for 50 years. An automatic rain gage collects rainfall/melted snowfall data every 15 minutes and they have an 8-inch standard rain gage and a digital temperature system. Daily maximum temperatures and minimum temperatures along with daily precipitation are recorded each day. Their observations have helped continue weather observations at Portland, IN for the National Weather Service since 1940.  In June of 1988 the Plant recorded a high of 102 degrees, with a high of 101 being set the following month in July and 100 being recorded for the following month in August. January has been a fairly cold month for the Plant with four Januarys having a low of -20 or colder…the coldest being -29 set in January 1985. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Portland Sewage Plant. Pictured (L-R) are Crystal Chapman, Dean Chapman, Jimmy Chapman, Bob Brelsford, and Dave McGraw accepting the award for the Portland Sewage Plant.

 

Laotto, IN 15 year award

Laotto 15 year award    Mr. Clarence Lutter has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1993 at his home. Twenty-four hour precipitation is recorded each day. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Mr. Lutter diligently keeps all weather data that he has collected since he started. For 10 years prior to Mr. Lutter starting for the National Weather Service, he had taken weather observations for the State of Indiana. Mr. Lutter began his weather observing career with the National Weather Service after the state of Indiana stopped funding for its weather observing; and then he called the Indianapolis National Weather Service office to see about continuing to take weather observations. Mr. Lutter has always liked the weather and the outdoors since a kid and his love for the weather and helping out others has led to his long service for the National Weather Service. Pictured is Mr. Lutter accepting his 15 year award.

 

Winamac, IN 25 year award

Winamac, Indiana 25 year length of service award   Mr. Bradley Zellers and Mr. Ron Thomas and others have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service at the Winamac Wastewater Treatment Plant since 1983. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall, bare and sod soil temperatures, 24 hour evaporation, and snowfall water equivalent. The Winamac Wastewater Treatment Plant was one of the first sites to begin sending in their data to the National Weather Service over the internet. In addition to providing the weather data to the National Weather Service and the National Climatic Data Center, the Winamac Wastewater Treatment Plant also provides the data to local schools and individuals who plow snow in the winter. They also give tours to Boy Scout troops showing them the weather equipment and teaching them what the equipment does and measures. In June and August of 1988 they recorded a high temperature of 102 degrees. A temperature of 100 degrees was measured in September 1984. On the other end of the temperature spectrum a temperature of -29 degrees was measured in January of 1985. January has had 3 years of -20 degrees or colder. In July of 2003, 11.47 inches of rain was recorded. In December 2000, 24.0 inches of snowfall was recorded. These observations are part of the continuous weather record reported at Winamac, IN for the National Weather Service since 1906. The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like Mr. Zellers and Mr. Thomas and the Winamac Wastewater Treatment Plant. Pictured are (L-R) Mr. Bradley Zellers and Mr. Ron Thomas accepting the 25 year award for the Winamac Wastewater Treatment Plant.

 

 Francesville, IN 10 year award

Francesville, Indiana 10 year length of service award   Mr. Greg Stone has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service in Francesville, IN since 1998. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall and snowfall water equivalent.  Mr. Stone began taking weather observations for the National Weather Service because the city of Francesville had put in a sewer system with two lagoons and needed to keep track of the rainfall for operations to send on to the State of Indiana. So he contacted TV stations in South Bend and Lafayette and they suggested contacting the National Weather Service. Mr. Stone did just that and since the National Weather Service was looking for a new weather observer in the Francesville area, Mr. Stone was set up as an official National Weather Service Cooperative weather observing site. In July of 1999, he recorded a high temperature of 99 degrees. On the other end of the thermometer, in January 2009 he recorded a low temperature of -23 degrees. In July 2003, he recorded 15.27 inches of rain and in January 1999 27.2 inches of snowfall was recorded. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Stone for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Stone accepting his 10 year length of service award from the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office. 

 

Butler, IN 10 year award

Butler, Indiana 10 year award    Mr. Dean Malcolm has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service in Butler, IN since 1998. Daily observations include rainfall and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. In September 2003, he recorded 10.10 inches of rain. His highest yearly rainfall total is 45.10 inches for 2003. He also remembers at the beginning of June 2008, that he received 1.50 inches of rain in just 20 minutes. He said that he could only see a few feet in front of him. Mr. Malcolm farms 1400 acres of land and farmers and others in the neighboring area call Mr. Malcolm for his precipitation report. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Malcolm for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Malcolm accepting his 10 year length of service award from the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office. 

 

Hartford City, IN 15 year award

Hartford City 15 year award     Mr. Chris Kirkwood has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service in Hartford City, IN since 1993. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall, and snowfall water equivalent.  Another rain gage collects rainfall data every 15 minutes and this is submitted to the National Weather Service monthly. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. In July 1999 he recorded a high of 98 degrees. On the other end of the spectrum he recorded a low of -26 degrees in January 1994.  In July 1998 he recorded 8.88 inches of rainfall. In January 1999 he recorded 22.5 inches of snowfall…a good total for a single month. He has recorded observations through some intense rainfall and ice storms that have knocked out power for a week. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Kirkwood for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Kirkwood accepting his 15 year length of service award from Brentley Lothamer…Observation Program Leader at the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office.

 

Plymouth, IN 15 year award

Plymouth, Indiana 15 year length of service award for the National Weather Service   Mr. Edward Kelso has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service in Plymouth, IN since January 1993. Mr. Kelso got started by seeing an ad in the paper from the National Weather Service for a weather observer to replace the existing one there in Plymouth. He commented that he has enjoyed every year of his weather observing. Daily observations include high and low temperatures, rainfall, snowfall, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Climate data is used in litigation, insurance industry, consultants and engineers, medical, public utilities, transportation industry, agriculture, and many other uses. In July 1999 he recorded a high of 102 degrees. On the other end of the spectrum he recorded a low of -22 degrees in January 1994. In June 1994 he recorded 10.51 inches of rainfall. In January 1999 he recorded 47.7 inches of snowfall…a good total for a single month. His highest snow depth was also in that same month…24 inches. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Kelso for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. Pictured is Mr. Kelso accepting his 15 year length of service award from the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office.

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