IWX Coop awards for 2011 

 

 

Eau Claire, MI observer receives Thomas Jefferson award

Herbert Teichman with his Thomas Jefferson award surrounded by wife and family   Mr. Teichman at his weather equipment   Mr. Mike Sabones and Mr. Brentley Lothamer giving Mr. Teichman (center) his Thomas Jefferson Award

Mr. Teichman's Thomas Jefferson award   Mr. Herbert Teichman    Mr. Teichman's award cake

Recognizing 43 Years of service to America, NOAA’s National Weather Service has named Eau Claire, MI resident Herbert Teichman as a 2011 recipient of the agency’s Thomas Jefferson Award for outstanding service in the Cooperative Weather Observer Program. The award is the agency’s most prestigious and only 5 are presented this year to cooperative weather observers from around the country.

“Cooperative observers are the bedrock of weather data collection and analysis,” said Dr. Jack Hayes, director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Satellites, high-speed computers, mathematical models and other technological breakthroughs have brought great benefits to the Nation in terms of better forecasts and warnings. But without the century-long accumulation of accurate weather observations taken by volunteer observers, scientists could not begin to adequately describe the climate of the United States. We cannot thank Mr. Teichman enough for his years of service to America.”
 
Mr. Teichman has a passion for the weather and is very active in the community. He owns and operates the Tree-Mendus Fruit farm (http://www.treemendus-fruit.com/) and hosts many neighborhood activities at the farm. These activities include the International Cherry Pit Spit contest. You can always count on something going on for the community to enjoy throughout the year. Mr. Teichman also provides his data to numerous sources including the media and local government. He always expresses his concern about making sure his weather observations are correct and that they get to the National Weather Service on time. “The fruit business is highly governed by the weather”, Mr. Teichman said, “Rainfall, drought, heat, and frost are just some of the factors that affect our many fruit trees”. His fruit tree business includes apples, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, pears, and plums. Mr. Teichman is very diligent in his weather observations taking neat, legible, and accurate observations and even has all of his weather records back to the beginning.
 
Teichman became an official observer at the Eau Claire site on August 1, 1968, taking over from his father, William (who also received the Thomas Jefferson Award). Looks like the apple did not fall far from the tree in this case. William Teichman founded the site in 1923, recording daily temperature, precipitation, snowfall, snow depth and snowfall water equivalent for the National Weather Service. Mr. Herbert Teichman has found memories as a child helping his father take the weather observations and discussing the observations and the weather over supper. Adhering to his volunteer duties through such weather extremes as 30-inch snow days, temperatures well below zero, and sweltering drought conditions, Teichman is the latest volunteer in the family whose efforts provide a continuous climate record since 1923 for Eau Claire, MI. His weather observations are also of great importance to his business, Tree-Mendus Fruit.
 
Mr. Teichman’s weather records retain their importance as time goes by. His long and continuous records provide an accurate picture of a locale’s normal weather, and give climatologists and others a basis for predicting future trends. The data that Mr. Teichman collects is invaluable for scientists studying floods, droughts and heat and cold waves. Mr. Teichman was awarded the Thomas Jefferson award on a beautiful sunny autumn day on his fruit tree farm with many family, friends, and media in attendance.

 

Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant 25 year award

25 year length of service award for Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant    The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. The employees at the Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1986. Daily observations include the river level on the Wabash River in Bluffton, maximum and minimum temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  An automatic rain gage collects rainfall/melted snowfall data every 15 minutes. Then every month the data from the automated rain gage is sent to the Northern Indiana office of the National Weather Service. Here are just a few examples of the weather that the Wastewater Treatment Plant has recorded. On July 31 1999 the Wastewater Treatment Plant recorded a high of 102 degrees. In January 1994 the plant recorded a low of -22 degrees with January 2009 coming close at -17 degrees. The highest monthly rainfall total that they have recorded is 12.88 inches back in July 2003. The highest 24-hr rainfall total was on July 22 1998 at 5.37 inches. The highest yearly precipitation total they recorded was in 2003 at 53.21 inches and the lowest was in 1988 at 27.10 inches…and the yearly average while the Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant has been taking weather observations is 38.45 inches. The highest monthly snowfall total they recorded was 25.1 inches in February 2011. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Volunteer weather observers, such as at the Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant, conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat and cold waves affecting us all. The data is also used in agricultural planning, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, and litigation. COOP data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant. Pictured are (L-R) Jane Searles, Tammy Campbell, and Greg Castilow accepting the award for the Bluffton Wastewater Treatment Plant from Brentley Lothamer (far right), Observation Program Leader at the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office. Photo taken by NWS Northern Indiana Hydrologist Mike Rehbein. 

 

Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility 25 year award

  Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility 25 year length of service award       The employees at the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1986. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum temperatures, soil temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  An automatic rain gage collects rainfall/melted snowfall data every 15 minutes. Then every month the data from the automated rain gage is sent to the Northern Indiana office of the National Weather Service. Here are just a few examples of the weather that the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility has recorded.  On June 26 1988 the Water Pollution Control Facility recorded a high of 103 degrees. On January 19 1994 the plant recorded a low of -24 degrees with the very next day coming in with a low of -23 degrees. The highest monthly rainfall total that they have recorded is 11.60 inches back in June 1986. The highest yearly precipitation total they recorded was 1990 at 54.88 inches and the lowest was 2010 at 29.46 inches. The highest monthly snowfall total they recorded was 18.0 inches in January 2003. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Volunteer weather observers, such as at the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility, conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat and cold waves affecting us all. The data is also used in agricultural planning, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, and litigation. COOP data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility. Pictured are (L-R) Bob Furnas, Eric Arter, Mike Cook, Rick Kreischer, and Austin Babb accepting the award for the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility.  

 

Warsaw 4S 20 year award

20 year length of service award for Warsaw 4S National Weather Service COOP site     Mrs. Susan Zellers has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1991. Daily precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) is recorded each day. Her observations are helping to continue weather observations at Warsaw, IN for the National Weather Service since 1984.  The largest amount of rainfall that she has recorded is 10.29 inches in June 1994 and back in December 2000 she recorded the highest snowfall for a month at 29.9 inches. The lowest precipitation total for a month that she has recorded is 0.38 inches in April 2004. The highest yearly precipitation total she has recorded is 45.99 inches for 2009 and the lowest is 31.62 inches for 2002. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful for Mrs. Zellers and thanks her for her continued dedication in taking weather observations. Pictured is Mrs. Zellers accepting her 20 year award.

 

Grover Hill 35 year award

Mr. and Mrs. Ross accepting 35 year length of service weather observing award   Mr. William Ross and his wife have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1976. They record precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, water equivalency of snowfall, and snow depth) daily. When they bought their store back in 1975, they just continued the weather observations from the previous owner. Their rainfall measurements, besides helping their community and the National Weather Service, also help them in getting an idea of how much rain fell on their farm just shy of 1000 acres. Their observations are helping to continue weather observations at Grover Hill, OH for the National Weather Service since 1954.  The highest monthly precipitation total that they have recorded is 10.06 inches back in August 2007. The highest yearly precipitation total they have recorded is this year, 2011, and as of 12/9 their yearly total was 50.50 inches. They lowest yearly precipitation amount was 24.90 inches in 1988. The highest seasonal snowfall amount was 51.5 inches in July 1981-June 1982. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. & Mrs. Ross for their continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured are Mr. & Mrs. Ross accepting their 35 year award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

 Three Rivers Wastewater Treatment Plant 50 year award, 20 year Individual award for James Shears, 15 year award for Joseph Madaras

50 year length of service award for the Three Rivers Wastewater Treatment Plant, 20 year award for James Shears, 15 year award for Joseph Madaras  The Three Rivers Wastewater Treatment Plant has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1956. They have an 8-inch standard rain gage and a digital temperature system. Daily maximum and minimum temperatures along with daily precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) are recorded. They also record the river level on the St. Joseph River. Their observations have helped continue weather observations at Three Rivers, MI for the National Weather Service since 1896.  Back in June 1988 the plant recorded a high of 103 degrees and has recorded 4 days of 100+ degrees. In January 1994 a low of -23 degrees was recorded. The plant has recorded 3 months with lows of -20 and lower. The highest yearly precipitation was 2011 at 47.46 and the lowest yearly precipitation was 21.59 in 1963. The highest seasonal (July – June) snowfall is 68.7” in 2007-2008. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like the Three Rivers Wastewater Plant, James Shears, and Joseph Madaras. Pictured (L-R) are James Shears, Jim Baker, and Joseph Madaras accepting the award for the Portland Sewage Plant. Mr. Shears is also accepting a 20 year Individual length of service award and Mr. Madaras is also accepting a 15 year Individual length of service award.

 

Knox WWTP employees' 10 year awards

Kelly Clemons and Sterling Patrick accept 10 year length of service COOP weather observing awards   Sterling Patrick and Kelly Clemons of the Knox, IN Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service (NWS) since 2001. Precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) along with high and low temperatures are recorded each day. Their observations are helping to continue weather observations at Knox, IN for the National Weather Service since 1983. In July 2011 they recorded a high of 96 degrees. Also in January 2009…they recorded a low temperature of -25 degrees. Back in August 2006 they recorded 10.63 inches of rain…and the following August, August 2007, they recorded 10.28 inches of rain. The highest yearly precipitation total they have recorded is 50.54” for the year 2008 and the lowest they have recorded is 30.19” for the year 2005. The snowiest winter they have recorded is 67.2 inches for the season 2010-2011. The highest snowfall total for a month is 30.4 inches for December 2010. They have had their share of interesting weather. Two very strong wind events have knocked down many, many trees and the WWTP has been struck by lightning a few times. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The NWS thanks both Sterling Patrick and Kelly Clemons for their continued dedication in taking weather observations. The NWS Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured are (L-R) Kelly Clemons and Sterling Patrick accepting their 10 year Individual Length of Service Awards from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

 Decatur Sewage Treatment Plant employee 25 year award

   Mr. Bob Gavin has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1986 at the Decatur Sewage Treatment Plant. Maximum temperatures and minimum temperatures along with precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) are recorded each day. His observations have helped continue weather observations at Decatur, IN for the National Weather Service since 1931. Over the years he has recorded a lot of weather. For example, in February 2011 he recorded 27.0 inches of snowfall for just one month. In July of 2003 he recorded 10.42 inches of rainfall for just one month. The highest yearly precipitation total he has recorded is 49.66 inches for the year 2011 and the lowest total is 24.64 for the year 1988. The highest snowfall seasonal total was 52.8 inches in 2002-2003. Mr. Gavin recorded a high of 100 degrees on July 22 2011 and a low temperature of -17 degrees on January 17 2009. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States along with other numerous users such as the agricultural industry and the transportation industry. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Gavin accepting his 25 year length of service award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Paulding Water Works employee 15 year award

Mr. Dan Workman has been taking weather observations at the Paulding Water Works for the National Weather Service since 1996. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum air temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Some weather observations that he has taken are…in July 2003, he recorded 8.49 inches of rainfall. The highest annual precipitation total that he has recorded is 50.22 inches in 2011. The lowest total will be this year…2012. In February 2011, for one month he recorded 23.5 inches of snow. For the season of 2002-2003, he recorded 48.0 inches of snowfall. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Workman for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture and transportation, use the data that is collected.

 

 

 Marion Municipal Utilities employee 40 year award

Mr. Mike Hamaker has been taking weather observations at the Marion Municipal Utilities for the National Weather Service since 1971. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum air temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Some weather observations that he has taken are…in July 1998, he recorded 11.94 inches of rainfall. The highest annual precipitation total that he has recorded is 54.68 inches in 1998. The lowest total was in 1988 at 27.74 inches. In December 1973, for one month he recorded 33.1 inches of snow. For the season of 1981-1982, he recorded 69.2 inches of snowfall. On June 26 1988 he recorded a high temperature of 103 degrees F. On two dates, January 20 1985 and January 21 1985 he recorded a low temperature of minus 23 degrees F. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Hamaker for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture and transportation, use the data that is collected.

Return to Awards


USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.