IWX COOP Awards for 2012

 

 

 

Benton Harbor, Michigan airport employee 40 Year Award

John Chaddock receiving his 40 year COOP award from the National Weather Service  Mr. John Chaddock took weather observations at the Southwest Michigan Regional Airport for the National Weather Service from 1972 to 2012. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum air temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalency.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Some weather observations that he has taken are…in August 2007, he recorded 11.22 inches of rainfall. The highest annual precipitation total that he has recorded is 47.27 inches in 1990. The lowest total was in 1979 at 26.61 inches. In December 1989, for one month he recorded 87.0 inches of snow! For the season of 2007-2008, he recorded 162.0 inches of snowfall! On July 30 1999 and July 21 2002 he recorded a high temperature of 104 degrees F. On two dates, January 16 1994 and January 19 1994 he recorded a low temperature of minus 17 degrees F. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Chaddock for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture, public utilities, and transportation, use the data that is collected. Pictured is Mr. Chaddock (right) accepting his 40 year length of service award from Brentley Lothamer Observation Program Leader at the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

Angola, IN 35 Year Award

35 year individual weather observer award  Mr. Edward Nagle has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service (NWS) since 1977 and his observations are helping to continue weather observations at Angola, IN for the National Weather Service since 1898.  He records precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, water equivalency of snowfall, and snow depth) and maximum/minimum temperatures daily. His COOP site also has an automated rain gage that records rainfall/snowfall water equivalency every 15 minutes. He downloads that 15 minute data once a month and sends that to the National Weather Service. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States as well as used in a variety of industries. The highest monthly precipitation total that Mr. Nagle has recorded is 13.26 inches back in August 2007. The highest yearly precipitation total that he has recorded is 51.75 inches in 2011. The lowest yearly precipitation amount was 31.49 inches in 1978. The highest seasonal snowfall amount was 74.9 inches in July 1981-June 1982. The highest temperature that he has recorded is 101 degrees F back in June 1988. The coldest temperature that he has recorded is -27 degrees set back in January 1981. Mr. Nagle was fortunate enough to have a thermograph running at that time in January 1981 and the -27 degrees caused the needle to drop off of the recording paper which bottoms out at -20 degrees F. Mr. Nagle got his start taking weather observations for the National Weather Service because while working at the local university he saw an ad in the local newspaper, called the NWS, and volunteered his services. Since his start, he has kept all the months of weather records that he has taken which is very impressive. Much has changed at his COOP weather observing site, such as fields around his house being replaced with streets and houses; but one thing that has not changed is Mr. Nagle’s diligent dedication to taking accurate weather observations for the National Weather Service and his community. The NWS thanks Mr. Nagle for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Nagle accepting his 35 year award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service Office.

 

Wauseon, OH Water Treatment Plant employee 10 Year Award

wauseon water treatment plant employee Jeff Harmon 10 yr length of service COOP weather observer award   Mr. Jeff Harmon has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service at the Wauseon Water Treatment Plant since 2002. Daily observations include maximum temperature, minimum temperature, snowfall, snow depth, rainfall and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. For the month of July 2006, he recorded 3.01 inches of rain. He also recorded 25.7 inches of snowfall in February 2011. Highest yearly precipitation total Mr. Harmon recorded was 49.26 inches for the year 2011. Highest seasonal snowfall total was 43.0 inches for the season 2002-2003. Highest temperature he recorded was in July 2012 at 105 degrees F and in June 2012 104 degrees F was recorded. Lowest temperature that he recorded was -18 degrees F back in January 2009. The National Weather Service is very grateful to Mr. Harmon for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Harmon accepting his 10 year length of service award from the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office.

 

Montpelier, OH Water Treatment Plant employees 10 Year Awards

Josh Fritsch and Bill Blakely receiving their 10 year length of service weather observing awards   Josh Fritsch and Bill Blakely of the Montpelier, OH Water Treatment Plant have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service (NWS) since 2002. Precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) along with high and low temperatures are recorded each day. They also took river readings on the St. Joseph River in town. Their observations helped to continue weather observations at Montpelier, OH for the National Weather Service since 1891. On June 29 2012 and July 7 2012 they recorded a high of 103 degrees and recorded a high of 100+ on three other days in 2012. On January 16 and 17 2009…they recorded a low temperature of -17 degrees. Back in August 2007 they recorded 12.69 inches of rain. The highest yearly precipitation total they have recorded is 54.55” for the year 2011 and the lowest they have recorded is 28.44” for the year 2002. The snowiest winter they have recorded is 56.3 inches for the season 2007-2008. The highest snowfall total for a month is 25.8 inches for February 2011. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The NWS thanks both Josh Fritsch and Bill Blakely for their dedication in taking weather observations. The NWS Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured are (L-R) Josh Fritsch and Bill Blakely accepting their 10 year Individual Length of Service Awards from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Hicksville, OH 20 Year Award

Robert Meyer accepts a 20 year length of service award for taking weather observations    Mr. Robert Meyer has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1992 at his home. Prior to that, he was taking weather observations at the Hicksville Wastewater Treatment Plant. Maximum temperatures and minimum temperatures along with precipitation (rainfall, snowfall, snow depth) are recorded each day. His observations have helped continue weather observations at Hicksville, OH for the National Weather Service since 1965. Over the years he has recorded a lot of weather. For example, in February 2011 he recorded 25.6 inches of snowfall for just one month. In July of 2005 he recorded 10.28 inches of rainfall for just one month. The highest yearly precipitation total he has recorded is 45.35 inches for the year 2011 and the lowest total is 28.69 for the year 2002. The highest snowfall seasonal total was 43.4 inches in 2002-2003. Mr. Meyer recorded a high of 107 degrees on June 29 2012 along with 9 days in his 20 years with 100+ temperatures. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an areal picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States along with other numerous users such as the agricultural industry and the transportation industry. The weather data that Mr. Meyer collects is also used by local businesses. Mr. Meyer diligently keeps all weather data that he has collected since he started. In the past, a relative of his has also kept weather records for the National Weather Service. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Pictured is Mr. Meyer accepting his 20 year award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Niles, MI Wastewater Treatment Plant employees awards

  The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Don Hartman, Vince Muntz, and Ed Gutschenritter of the Niles Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1987, 2002, and 1977 respectively. Daily observations include maximum and minimum temperatures, rainfall, snowfall, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent. Here are just a few of the weather observing numbers from over the years at the Niles WWTP. In 1990, 50.02” of precipitation was recorded and just 31.82” was recorded in 1999. For the snowfall season of 2000-2001, 103.7” of snow was recorded with 63.2” of that total coming in December 2000. The highest temperature recorded was 102 degrees on July 5 2012 and the coldest is -5 degrees on February 10 2011. The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Volunteer weather observers, such as the employees at the Niles WWTP, conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat, and cold waves affecting us all. The data are also used in agricultural planning, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, and litigation. COOP data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like Mr. Hartman, Mr. Muntz, and Mr. Gutschenritter. Pictured are (L-R) Don Hartman, Vince Muntz, and Ed Gutschenritter accepting their Individual Length of Service Awards from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

South Bend, IN Wastewater Treatment Plant employees 30 year awards

Tom Nagy and Tony Miner of the South Bend Wastewater Treatment Plant have been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service (NWS) since 1982.  Precipitation (rainfall, snowfall water equivalency) along with the St. Joseph River level are recorded daily. In 2011 they recorded nearly 50” of precipitation coming in at 47.37”. In September 2008 they recorded 12.76” of precipitation. They have also in numerous river flooding situations helped send in valuable river level data to the National Weather Service to aid in the NWS getting out River Flood Warnings. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. The National Weather Service is very grateful to weather observers like Mr. Nagy and Mr. Miner. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property.

 

Kingsbury, IN 20 year award

  Mr. Frank Zolvinski has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1992. He records precipitation every day. He began his weather observing career by seeing an ad in the local newspaper requesting a weather observer for his area. He does a lot of work for his church and wanted to practice what he teaches, so he wanted to volunteer and help out others and his community by taking weather observations. His family also has a dairy farm nearby and over his years of taking weather observations, they have inquired of him numerous times on how much precipitation he received. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new weather model run along with helping to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall has fallen in the area.  The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. For example, in September of 2008, he recorded 13.06 inches of rainfall…which included over nine inches of rainfall from the remains of Hurricane Ike. The highest annual precipitation total that he has recorded is 47.37 inches back in 2008. The lowest total will be this year…2012. In December 2000, for one month he recorded 37.7 inches of snow. For the season of 2010-2011, he recorded 76.8 inches of snowfall. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Zolvinski for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture and transportation, use the data that is collected. Pictured is Mr. Zolvinski along with his dog Simon accepting his 20 year length of service award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Denver, IN 10 year award

   Mr. Steve Hagan has been taking river observations on the Eel River for the National Weather Service since 2002. The data collected is now able to be ingested daily into each new river model run.  The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Hagan for his continued dedication in taking river observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture and transportation, use the data that is collected. Pictured is Mr. Hagan accepting his 10 year length of service award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

Columbia City, IN Water Pollution Control Facility employee 20 year award

   The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Mike Cook, an employee at the Columbia City Water Pollution Control Facility has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1992. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum air temperatures, soil temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  An automatic rain gage collects rainfall/melted snowfall data every 15 minutes. Then every month the data from the automated rain gage is sent to the Northern Indiana office of the National Weather Service. Here are just a few examples of the weather that he has recorded.  On June 29 2012 recorded a high of 102 degrees. On January 19 1994 he recorded a low of minus 24 degrees with the very next day coming in with a low of -23 degrees. The highest monthly rainfall total that he has recorded is 8.79 inches back in July 2003. The highest yearly precipitation total recorded was 2009 at 45.85 inches and the lowest was 2010 at 29.46 inches. The highest monthly snowfall total recorded was 18.0 inches in January 2003. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. Volunteer weather observers, such as Mr. Cook, conscientiously contribute their time so that observations can provide the vital information needed. These data are invaluable in learning more about the floods, droughts, heat and cold waves affecting us all. The data is also used in agricultural planning, engineering, environmental-impact assessment, utilities planning, and litigation. COOP data plays a critical role in efforts to recognize and evaluate the extent of human impacts on climate. Pictured is Mike Cook accepting his 20 Year Length of Service Award from the National Weather Service Northern Indiana office.

 

Huntington, IN Water Works employee 15 Year Award

Larry Covey 15 year length of service weather award   Mr. Larry Covey has been taking weather observations for the National Weather Service since 1997 at the Huntington Water Works. Daily observations include the maximum and minimum air temperatures, 24 hour rainfall amounts, 24 hour snowfall amounts, snow depth, and snowfall water equivalent.  The data collected is ingested daily into each new weather model run, and helps to paint an aerial picture of how much rainfall/snowfall has fallen in the area.  An automatic rain gage collects rainfall/melted snowfall data every 15 minutes. Then every month the data from the automated rain gage is sent to the Northern Indiana office of the National Weather Service. The data is also used to build a climatic database of the United States. For example, in July 2003, he recorded 11.62 inches of rainfall. The highest annual precipitation total that he has recorded is 53.41 inches back in 2003. The lowest total will be this year…2012. In December 2000, for one month he recorded 26.6 inches of snow. For the season of 2002-2003, he recorded 40.3 inches of snowfall. The National Weather Service thanks Mr. Covey for his continued dedication in taking weather observations. The National Weather Service Cooperative Program spans all 50 states…collecting weather observations from numerous volunteer weather observers for the climate database, weather forecasts, and for the protection of life and property. Numerous industries throughout the country, such as agriculture and transportation, use the data that is collected. Pictured is Mr. Covey along accepting his 15 year length of service award from the Northern Indiana National Weather Service office.

 

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