Flood Safety Awareness Week

March 18-22, 2013

 


The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and NOAA's National Weather Service are once again partnering for National Flood Safety Awareness Week, March 18 –22, 2013. The agencies' goal is to improve understanding about flood risk among individuals, families, businesses and communities.  Knowledge and the right precautions can protect families, homes, and finances.

"I've seen the devastation that can occur from floods. They can happen at any time, anywhere across the United States, which means we all need to be prepared now," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "In addition to obtaining a flood insurance policy for your home or business, there are simple steps folks can do now to be prepared for flooding - develop a family emergency plan and have an emergency supply kit ready to go."

Floods are the most common hazard in the United States.  However, not all floods are alike. Floods typically occur when too much rain falls or snow melts too quickly. Chunks of ice from a thawing river can block its normal flow and force water out of its banks. While some floods develop slowly, flash floods develop suddenly.  Hurricanes can bring flooding to areas far inland from where they first hit the coast, as we witnessed two years ago from the devastating impacts of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee, and last year from Hurricanes Isaac and Sandy.

There are simple steps citizens can take today to reduce their risk to all types of floods.  Flood Safety Awareness Week is an excellent time for people and communities to learn about their flood risk and implement precautions to mitigate the threat to life and property.

“Flooding is dangerous and costly, killing nearly 100 people and causing an average of eight billion dollars in property damage in the United States each year,” said Dr. Louis W. Uccellini, director, NOAA’s National Weather Service, which produces an array of flood outlooks and forecasts, including watches and life-saving warnings. “A weather-ready nation is a prepared nation; one that will reduce flood losses by planning ahead, staying abreast of weather forecasts, and heeding the warnings.”

Dr. Uccellini emphasized that a primary flood killer is flooded roadways. People should never attempt to drive through them, but should “Turn Around, Don’t Drown,” NOAA’s flood safety slogan.

FEMA and the National Weather Service will provide the public with key information related to flood hazards, and ways to protect yourself and your property each day of National Flood Safety Awareness week. 

Follow FEMA and the North Platte NWS on social media throughout the week to stay informed and to share the information with your social networks. For more information on flood safety tips and information, visit www.ready.gov.  For information on how to obtain a flood insurance policy, visit www.floodsmart.gov

FEMA -  (Facebook and Twitter)

NWS North Platte -  (Facebook and Twitter)


 

The North Platte NWS will be covering a new topic for Flood Safety Awareness each day this week. 

Monday:  Flood Safety and Awareness
Tuesday:  Different Types of Floods
Wednesday:  Turn Around, Don't Drown
Thursday:  Flood Risk and Flood Insurance
Friday:  Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) and Partner Services

Find today's topic here


 

 Additional Links:

 

 

Turn Around Don't Drown