Severe Weather Event Recap
August 1st, 2013

Funnel clouds viewed southwest of Mullen - photo credit Wynn Wiens
Funnel clouds viewed southwest of Mullen - photo credit Wynn Wiens
Rotating wall cloud near Mullen - photo credit Wynn Wiens
Rotating wall cloud near Mullen - photo credit Wynn Wiens

Photo credit: Dean Cosgrove
Photo credit: Dean Cosgrove of Chasetours.com 

Facebook Photo Gallery from Severe Weather Event August 1st, 2013

Severe thunderstorms developed on Thursday afternoon, August 1st. The first storms developed along a warm front across  northern Nebraska.  Over 40 severe weather warnings were issued by the North Platte National Weather Service office.  

Numerous reports of large hail were noted, with the largest up to the size of baseballs.  Damaging winds, funnel clouds and heavy rainfall were also reported during this severe weather event. The preliminary local storm damage survey information, estimated the highest winds speeds in North Platte were near 100 miles an hour - where numerous large trees and large limbs were downed.  This also led to some power outages and damage to vehicles and homes. Large hail caused broken windows, from north of Whitman to southeast of the Bartlett area.  No tornadoes were confirmed, although funnel clouds were reported with supercell thunderstorms near Mullen, Arnold, and in southwestern Custer County. Extensive crop damage was found in southwestern Custer County where acres of corn and bean crops were damaged or destroyed from hail estimated up to the size of golfballs. 

Areas of heavy rainfall also accompanied the storms, with torrential rainfall flooding some yards and roads, including north of Johnstown, as well as in Chambers and portions of North Platte.
   

Tree fell on car in North Platte
Tree damage in North Platte

Tree damage in North Platte
Tree uprooted in North Platte 

Radar Reflectivity across Cherry and Hooker Counties
(Click to view - may be slow loading) (WMV format)

Radar Reflectivity across southwestern Custer County
(Click to view - may be slow loading) (WMV format)

Radar Reflectivity near North Platte (close view)
(Click to view - may be slow loading) (AVI format)

Map of local storm reports from August 1st, 2013
(Click on map above for preliminary local storm report information from August 1st, 2013)
 

V Notch Signature on Radar
V-Notch ("Flying Eagle) Radar Signature (above)

This radar signature does not necessarily predict tornado occurrence, but is usually only seen with strong and tall supercell thunderstorms, with characteristics that could correlate with those storms more likely to be tornadic.

The V-Notch, also nicknamed as the “flying eagle,” is a V-like pattern seen in the upper part of the precipitation shield. This is usually seen northeast of the hook echo area of the parent storm.
This type of radar pattern occurs, when the storm updraft is so strong and the supercell thunderstorm extends high enough up into the atmosphere, that the upper level winds are forced to be deflected around the core of the storm. This then helps to spread the precipitation outward.

 

Page composition
by
Steve Carmel

 


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