Color-coded by strength:

March Tornadoes

Not color-coded:

March Tornadoes

March 19, 1849
Counties:  Breckinridge
F-scale:
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:
Narrative:  Tornado hit Big Spring.  Possibly a significant tornado, comparable to a tornado in the same area March 27, 1890.

March 2, 1878
Counties:  Casey
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  8
Injuries:
Path width:  400 yards
Path length:
Time:  2:30pm
Narrative:  A tornado near Rich Hill and Mount Olive moved northeast and swept away dwellings, large trees, horses, cattle, and other stock.  Near Rich Hill, one family of seven was killed.  The mother was blown 400 yards, and her two daughters "with arms interlocked" were blown 50 yards.  One other death occurred in the village of Mount Olive, where several homes were destroyed.

March 20, 1882
Counties:  Fayette
F-scale:  F2
Deaths: 0
Injuries:   1
Path width:
Path length:
Time:
Narrative:  Hit the northern part of Lexington.  Houses were unroofed.  Barns and the L&N roundhouse were flattened.  The roof was torn off of the Tarr Distillery at 899 Manchester Street.  According to the (Lexington) Weekly Press, the roof of "Mr. Sharp's house on the hill" was removed, and two chimneys were destroyed at the home of Mr. Bassett.  One person was severely injured, and may have died later.

March 27, 1890
Counties:  Hancock (from Daviess)
F-scale:  F2
Deaths: 2
Injuries:  15
Path width: 
Path length:  10 miles
Time:  7:00pm
Narrative:  One of central Kentucky's darkest days began when a tornado moved northeast from south of Knottsville to north of Patesville.  Two people died in homes that were destroyed.

March 27, 1890
Counties:  Jefferson KY, Clark IN
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  76
Injuries:  200
Path width:  300 yards
Path length:  15 miles
Time:  7:57pm
Narrative:  One of the most devastating tornadoes to ever strike Kentucky.  This historic event may have actually started in Harrison County IN, but is traditionally plotted from west of Shively, Kentucky, in western Jefferson County.  The tornado moved north-northeast and northeast through the Parkland neighborhood (Twenty-eighth and Dumesnil), leveling a few homes.  This F4 damage was the only clear example of F4 strength winds along the path.  However, when the tornado entered the city of Louisville it was 200 yards wide and grew to 500 yards wide as it plowed through the central business district downtown.  Multi-story downtown buildings were hit by the tornado and subsequently collapsed.  At least 44 deaths occurred at the Falls City Hall (1124 West Market Street).  The building collapsed with 200 people inside; 75 at a lodge meeting on the upper floor and 125 children with their mothers taking dancing lessons on the lower floor.  This was one of the highest tornado death totals in a single building ever recorded in the United States.  Damage totalled $2.5 million (1890 dollars) in Jefferson County, with another half a million dollars with F2 intensity damage in Jeffersonville IN...along with 20 injuries.  The tornado then turned to the right and re-crossed the Ohio River, coming back into Louisville dissipating near the present-day intersection of Zorn Avenue and River Road after badly damaging the city water tower.  5 churches, 7 railroad depots, 2 public halls, 3 schools, 10 tobacco warehouses, 32 manufacturing plants and 532 dwellings were destroyed by the tornado.  Union Station was crushed as well.  The next morning the newspaper called the storm "the whirling tiger of the air".  The city organized crews of 60 men each who worked day and night searching the wreckage, along with families and friends. Sightseers started arriving the next day, and the Guard was called to control the crowds. The City refused any outside aid. The Board of Trade organized a relief committee to oversee the recovery, and the Board also authorized $15,000 in pensions to widows and orphans of the storm. 

March 27, 1890
Counties:  Ohio, Grayson, Breckinridge, Hardin
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  7
Injuries:  40
Path width:  1200 yards
Path length:  60 miles (probably a family of tornadoes)
Time:  8:00pm
Narrative:  Moved east-northeast from seven miles northwest of Hartford.  Many miles of forest were leveled, and small farm communities were wiped out.  Homes were said to have "vanished" near Sulphur Springs (where two people were killed) and near Falls of Rough (where three people were killed).  The last damage was near Rineyville, where two people were killed in one home.

March 27, 1890
Counties:  Shelby, Henry
F-scale:  F3
Deaths: 3
Injuries:  10
Path width:  150 yards
Path length:  5 miles
Time:  8:15pm
Narrative:  Moved northeast from four miles south of Eminence, passing one mile north of Pleasureville.  Four farm houses were destroyed, and three members of a family were killed in one of them.

March 27, 1890
Counties:  Allen, Barren
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  4
Injuries:  25
Path width:  600 yards
Path length:  15 miles
Time:  9:00pm
Narrative:  Moved northeast from five miles south of Scottsville to near Tracy.  Four people were killed in Allen County as at least three homes were destroyed.  Death toll may have been as high as 17.

March 23, 1893
Counties:  Lincoln
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  3
Path width:    200 yards
Path length:  5 miles
Time: 
Narrative:  Moved east from the southeast edge of Stanford, passing near Rowland, two miles east of Stanford.  Homes and businesses were destroyed.  Mail from the post office was found up to two miles away.

March 23, 1917
Counties:  Floyd, Clark IN, Jefferson KY
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  46
Injuries:  250
Path width:  400 yards
Path length:  15 miles
Time:  3:08pm
Narrative:  One of the worst tornadoes in Kentuckiana's history.  The twister moved east-northeast from three miles west of New Albany and cut a swath of death and destruction through the north side of town.  Damage totalled $1,500,000 as 300 homes were destroyed, along with two schools and many other buildings.  While many homes were swept away, the deaths were concentrated in groups, including at least five (possibly 12) deaths at the Olden Street School, eight deaths at a wood specialties plant, and five deaths in one home.  Some children were killed on their way home from school.  The tornado dissipated after striking Harrod's Creek, Kentucky.

March 23, 1917
Counties:  Harrison IN
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  0
Injuries:   20
Path width:  600 yards
Path length:  7 miles
Time:  3:30pm
Narrative:  This large tornado passed one mile north of Corydon as it moved east across central Harrison County.  Many farm buildings were damaged, and one farm was almost completely blown away.  Its occupant was found in a ditch 200 feet from the foundation, unconscious, critically injured, and holding her unharmed baby.  Note:  it's interesting that Significant Tornadoes lists this tornado as having happened after the New Albany tornado, since the storms on this day were moving from west to east but Harrison County is west of New Albany.  One researcher, Gary Purlee, has suggested that the Harrison County and New Albany tornadoes were one and the same, with the initial touchdown at 2:50pm.

March 24, 1921
Counties:  Scott KY
F-scale:  F2
Deaths: 0
Injuries:  0
Path width: 
Path length:  5 miles
Time: 
Notes:  This tornado touched down near Watkinsville and moved northeast.  Barns, power poles, and trees were immediately blown down.  Some trees were uprooted and blown 20 feet.  Additional barns were destroyed on the Wiley and Bramlett farms.  The tornado quickly grew to 3/4 of a mile wide, and uprooted an entire orchard (nearly 100 trees) on the Green Farm west of Stamping Ground.  A chicken house was blown away, killing 92 of the 100 chickens within.  The Cook Farm suffered two destroyed barns and a badly damaged house.  As the tornado neared Stamping Ground, it narrowed to 1/4 mile wide, and then lifted just northeast of town.  W. A. Mitchell of the Lexington Weather Bureau office felt that the damage was straight-line winds (why he felt this way is unknown, and this project will instead agree with Grazulis that this was a true tornado).  The tornado may have dipped very briefly to earth again on or near Cincinnati Road south of Double Culvert, though no specific damage reports have been found from that area.  Witnesses described a "funnel-shaped cloud whirling along at high speed" that "sounded like a train coming across a railroad trestle" with debris circulating the funnel.  Near the tornado's touchdown point the twister was followed by hail that greatly damaged fruit trees.

March 24, 1921
Counties:  Madison
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  0
Injuries:   5
Path width: 
Path length:
Time: 
Narrative:  This tornado hit the Kirksville and Silver Creek areas.  Debris from one home blocked the railroad tracks for three hours.  Two people received injuries when a chimney fell on them and broke their ribs.  Several houses were reduced to kindling, and one tenant house was "blown completely away" near Silver Creek.  One boy received a broken leg.  Warwick Distillery at Silver Creek lost its roof.  Near Kirksville one home was demolished and another lost its roof.  A parlor rug from the house that lost its roof was later found in Phil Arbuckle's pasture, torn to rags, a mile away.  One farmer witnessed a "funnel shaped cloud accompanied by a roar" like a truck at Silver Creek.

March 18, 1925
Counties:  Allen, Barren, Monroe, Metcalfe (from Sumner TN)
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  39
Injuries:   95
Path width:  400 yards
Path length:  60 miles (probably a family of tornadoes)
Time:  5:00pm
Narrative:  From one of the worst tornado outbreaks ever to strike central Kentucky.  This tornado moved east-northeast from near Buck Lodge, eight miles north of Gallatin.  Homes were swept away in many communities, including Keytown, Angle, Oak Grove, and Liberty.  As many as eight people died in one home.  Trees were blown down in the steep valleys as well as on the hilltops.  At least 27 people died in Tennessee.  Crossing into Kentucky, the tornado struck Mt. Union (near the present-day intersection of KY 1421 and Napier Road) and then Holland, killing four.  The funnel may have either weakened or lifted over southern Barren County before striking Beaumont in Metcalfe County.  There it killed eight more, including five in one family.  Over 150 homes were damaged or destroyed.

March 18, 1925
Counties:  Harrison IN, Jefferson KY
F-scale:  F4
Deaths: 4
Injuries:  60
Path width:  1200 yards
Path length: 25 miles
Time:  5:15pm
Narrative:  Moved to the east-northeast from Mauckport to just south of Louisville.  Up to a mile wide, this very intense tornado swept away entire farms as it passed one mile north of Laconia and two miles south of Elizabeth.  Furniture from Indiana was later found in yards in Pleasure Ridge Park, KY.  The four deaths were in two separate Indiana farm homes.  In Kentucky, Jefferson County locations that were struck by the tornado or its parent thunderstorm included Orell, Greenwood Station, Kerrick Station, Blanton Station, Saint Helens, South Park, Iroquois Park, and Senning's Park.  The worst damage was on Eightheenth Street Road (today's Dixie Highway) from Kerrick Station to Greenwood Road (the Pleasure Ridge Park/Dixie Manor Shopping Center area today).  Three people were killed there.  Nothing was left standing from the river to Blanton Station in a swath two blocks wide.  The twister crossed Cane Run Road and demolished a home and Greenwood Elementary School on Greenwood Road at Waller Lane.  Damage was severe at Saint Helens, with one house completely removed except for one interior room. Trees and power lines were torn down along Eighteenth Street Road from Kerrick Station to Greenwood Road...a distance of about a mile.  Garages were destroyed in Senning's Park (site of Louisville's zoo at the time, located across New Cut Road from the Iroquois Amphitheater).  Fifty large trees were uprooted in Iroquois Park, and smaller trees were witnessed sailing through the air.  Power poles were torn down along New Cut Road.  There was minor damage along Inverness Avenue northeast of Iroquois Park.  A "queer greenish light" was reported before the storm hit.  Hail up to the size of hens' eggs fell with the storm from Parkland to Crescent Hill.  The day after the storm the head of the Louisville weather service office, J. L. Kendall, surveyed the damage.  He noted that the width of the tornado was 100 yards where it crossed Eighteenth Street Road, and widened to 500 yards as it entered Iroquois Park.  Timber between the river and Eighteenth Street Road along Greenwood Road was observed to have been felled pointing to a common center.

March 18, 1925
Counties:  Jefferson KY, Oldham
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  3
Injuries:  40
Path width: 
Path length:  10 miles
Time:  6:00pm
Narrative:  Moved northeast from the east edge of Louisville to near Pewee Valley.  At least a dozen homes were destroyed.  An injured person at Pewee Valley may have died several weeks later.  This tornado was probably spawned from the same thunderstorm that produced the earlier tornado in southwest Louisville (see previous entry).  It appears to have touched down at Hike's Point along Taylorsville Road and Brown's Lane.  Barns and outhouses were levelled, roofs were blown off, and a car was overturned.  The tornado moved to the northeast through persent-day Saint Regis Park and Hurstbourbne.  The twister may have lifted briefly as it crossed Shelbyville Road very near Eight Mile House (which was unaffected).  The tornado caused intermittent damage through Anchorage, and then grew in intensity and remained on the ground from O'Bannon into Pewee Valley.  The twister was 1/4 mile wide as it entered Pewee Valley where it destroyed a three-story brick home and a two-story frame house.  A two-story house in Pewee Valley was swept ten feet off its foundation and collapsed.  Trees blocked the Louisville-Pewee Valley road for two miles.  Immediately after the storm, Lagrange Interurban cars leaving Louisville could not get beyond Lyndon.  Two days after the tornado the tracks were still blocked beginning at O'Bannon Station.  Hail up to 2 1/4 inches in diamater pounded Crescent Hill, and the stones had large "horns" on them.

March 18, 1925
Counties:  Marion, Washington KY, Mercer, Jessamine, Fayette, Bourbon
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  2
Injuries:  40
Path width:  300 yards
Path length:  60 miles (skipping)
Time:  6:30pm
Notes:  What was almost certainly a family of tornadoes moved northeast from western Marion County (according to Grazulis) to 4 miles southwest of Paris in Bourbon County.  This project has so far been unable to find any damage in Marion or Jessamine Counties.  In Washington County many buildings across the county were leveled.  The country home of Judge Case near Springfield was unroofed.  The "Negro section" of Jimtown was destroyed, and all 25 houses in Jimtown were razed after the storm.  In Springfield 30 people were injured and 2 were killed (the two fatalities may have been from Jimtown).  Moving into Mercer County, two barns were lost on the Bond Farm.  A barn was damaged and a house unroofed on the Terhune Farm, barns were blown down on the Quartz and Shelton Farms, a house and a barn were lost on the Sanford Farm, and the home of Kye Crossfield at Ebenezer was destroyed.  The tornado was 1/4 mile wide in Mercer County. After possibly weakening or lifting in Jessamine County, the tornado slammed into eastern sections of Fayette County with renewed vigor.  Trees were blown down on Chilesburg Road, and many trees and fences were torn down on the John E. Madden Farm on Winchester Road about four miles out of Lexington (roughly where Winchester Road meets I-75 today).  The tornado reached its peak strength, high-end F3 (possibly F4) over a four-mile stretch of eastern Fayette County.  About five and a half miles from Lexington on Briar Hill Road the twister devastated the Kelley Farm.  Mrs. Kelley's 40-year-old "Negro hired hand" was blown 300 yards to his death.  Nearly every bone in his body was broken.  His right hip was dislocated to the point where it was alongside his chest.  No trace of his cabin was ever found.  The two-story eight-room main residence was "torn from its foundations" and reduced to a pile of rubble.  The farm's chickens were stripped of their feathers.  According to witnesses, the tornado was "cone-shaped and had a large black cloud at its top, coming out of the west.  A pillar of flame shot skyward when the vortex of the twister struck the Kelley residence."  Trees and telephone poles were blown down for a mile along Briar Hill Road.  The Jonas Weil Farm on Briar Hill Road suffered an unroofed home, two miles of destroyed fence, and 500 felled trees.  Moving along to the northeast, the Muir area was next in line (near the intersection of KY 1970 and KY 1973 today).  William Johnson's residence on Muir Pike was "piled upon its foundations and partly blown away."  The Deaver Farm was damaged, and a 15 pound rock was blown through a wall like a cannonball.  Many trees were blown down.  Proceeding into Bourbon County, the house of Rodes Donald had two rooms blown away, the Dudley School was moved four feet off its foundation, fifty trees were blown down on the Ewing Farm, and the Spears Farm on Stewart Road was damaged.  The tornado then finally began to weaken and it dissipated about four miles shy of Paris.

March 24, 1937
Counties:  Fayette, Clark KY
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:   5
Injuries:  28
Path width:  150 yards
Path length:  15 miles
Time:  5:50pm
Notes:  This major tornado touched down in Fayette County between Athens and Boone Creek, probably between Gentry Road and Athens-Boonesboro Road.  Only one structure was destroyed in Fayette County, which was a barn on the Scott Farm when the tornado was about 200 yards wide and less than a minute old.  The tornado grew in strength very rapidly, and after traveling only about a mile it crossed Boone Creek and completely swept away a house on the Clark County side of the creek.  A four-year-old girl in the house was blown 200 yards and survived with a broken leg.  The storm continued to the northeast through Becknerville (where the funnel was 400 yards wide), with its sights set on Winchester.  The storm roared across Two Mile Pike and into the southern and eastern outskirts of the city.  The worst of the storm hit a section variously called, among different sources, "the Patio," "Patio Pike," and "Patio Station," which is believed to be in the vicinity of the intersection of modern-day Patio Street and Hamilton Street along the railroad tracks.  Here a 9-year-old boy was partially scalped and suffered a fractured skull.  One hundred buildings were leveled and parts of houses were found half a mile away.  Only three houses remained standing on the far east side of Winchester.  A witness on a high spot on East Broadway witnessed the tornado decimate the Patio/Muddy Creek Pike area around 6pm.  The tornado was a "funnel-shaped spiral, light gray at the top and black at the bottom."   The tornado continued northeast, crossing Irving Road and Ironworks Road, finally dissipating five miles east of Winchester.  It was noted in the local press that the tornado never left the ground along its 15 mile path, and made a "clean sweep" of the earth.  It was called the worst storm in the history of Clark County, and probably still is (rivaled only by the April 3, 1974 tornado).  Though the tornado missed central Winchester, the city was pummeled by hail up to 4" in diameter (grapefruit sized) that damaged roofs, ripped car tops, and covered the ground like snow.  The hailstones had "long icicles" on them.  Click here for a map showing the approximate path of the tornado through Winchester.

March 16, 1942
Counties:  Grayson, Hardin
F-scale:  F4
Deaths:  9
Injuries:  40
Path width:  200 yards
Path length:  30 miles
Time:  6:15pm
Narrative:  Moved east-northeast from north of Caneyville to near Summit.  People died in seven different homes north of Caneyville, Millwood, Leitchfield, Clarkson, and Summit.  About twenty homes were destroyed, and some were swept completely away.  Two of the deaths were in Hardin County.

March 16, 1942
Counties:  Nelson
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  4
Injuries:  20
Path width:  200 yards
Path length:  15 miles
Time:  7:30pm
Narrative:  Moved east-northeast, passing north of Bardstown, killing people in three different homes.  Rural homes were leveled from near Deatsville to Cox's Creek.

March 19, 1943
Counties:  Harrison, IN
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:   2
Path width:   400 yards
Path length: 
Time:  2:15pm
Narrative:  Moved northeast at Laconia, ripping the roof and a wall off the Laconia school.  Only two of the 150 students were injured.

March 22, 1952
Counties:  LaRue
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:
Injuries:  
Path width:   300 yards
Path length:
Time:  12:05am
Grazulis Narrative:  Moved northeast across the south part of Hodgenville.  The tornado destroyed nine cottages as well as the county fairgrounds.  A dozen other homes were unroofed.  About forty other homes had minor damage.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC, Grazulis, and  Storm Data give a time of 12:05am,  NCDC 12:03am.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards, Grazulis 100 yards, Storm Data 300 yards.  Would tend to believe Storm Data's width.

March 4, 1955
Counties:   Madison
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  2
Path width:  250 yards
Path length:  5 miles
Time:  6:45pm
Grazulis Narrative:  Moved east from Cottonburg to south of Richmond.  Two homes and several barns were destroyed.  Ten cows were killed.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC call this an F3, Grazulis calls it an F2.  SPC and NCDC give it a path length of 9 miles, Grazulis and Storm Data give a length of 5 miles.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards, and Grazulis and Storm Data 250 yards.  (Grazulis and Storm Data list the touchdown at "Cottonwood", by which they probably mean "Cottonburg", which is west of Richmond two miles east of the Garrard County line.)

March 7, 1956
Counties:  Washington IN
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:  
Path width: 
Path length:
Time:  12:10am
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC list this as an F2...Grazulis does not list it.  SPC and Storm Data give a time of 12:10am, NCDC gives 12:06am.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC says 30 yards.  Storm Data says it struck one mile south of Salem and moved east.

March 6, 1961
Counties:  Scott IN
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries  3
Path width:  50 yards
Path length:  2 miles
Time:  7:06am
Grazulis narrative:  Moved northeast through the northwest corner of Austin.  Eight smokestacks were toppled at a canning plant, and the roof was ripped off a house.  Injuries occurred when three trailers were destroyed.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards, Grazulis 50 yards.


March 6, 1961
Counties:  Dubois
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  8:00am
Noted discrepancies:  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards.  Storm Data says this tornado moved from southwest of Ferdinand to Siberia (Siberia proper is actually in Perry County, just over the county line).  The ending lat/lon given is just inside Perry County as well.  Will map as such, but further research would be helpful.


March 6, 1961
Counties:  Clark IN
F-scale:
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  10:00am
Noted discrepancies:  SPC gives a path length of 1/10 of a mile, NCDC gives nothing.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC gives nothing.  SPC and NCDC give no F-scale rating, and it's not listed in Grazulis.  Storm Data says a pole barn was reduced to rubble along IN 160 northwest of Charlestown.  However the lat/lon given doesn't quite agree with that location.  More research is necessary.

March 21, 1962
Counties:  Fayette
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:
Path length:  1/3 of a mile
Time:  9:00am
Grazulis narrative:  At Blueberry Hill, two barns were "blown up and flattened" by a tornado that touched down south of Lexington.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC list this as an F1, Grazulis calls it an F2.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards, Grazulis nothing.  Grazulis lists it at 10:00am.

March 16, 1963
Counties:  Washington IN
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  100 yards
Path length:  1 mile
Time:  5:20pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved east-northeast from five miles southeast of Salem.  Farm buildings on one farm, and a house on another farm, were destroyed.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC give this a path width of 800 yards, Grazulis and Storm Data give 100 yards.  Storm Data says this tornado hit four and a half miles southeast of Salem near IN 60 (present-day IN 160?) and the Middle Blue River.

March 19, 1963
Counties:  Dubois
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  2:00pm
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC rank this as an F2, but Grazulis does not list it.  SPC gives a path length of 1/10 of a mile and a path width of 10 yards...NCDC gives nothing for either.

March 19, 1963
Counties:  Washington IN
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:  2
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  3:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  Hit at Becks Mill.  Two women were killed when their shelter collapsed onto them.  The old fruit cellar behind the house may have been weakened by rain water and the sudden pressure change.  Their home had only broken windows.  One of the women had been injured in a tornado on April 3, 1956.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC gives a path length of 1/10 of a mile and a path width of 10 yards...NCDC gives nothing for either.

March 4, 1964
Counties:  Logan
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  5
Path width:  880 yards
Path length:  7 miles
Time:  2:25pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved northeast from two miles west of Adairville to Schochoh.  A home was unroofed and tenant homes and barns were destroyed.  Livestock was killed and cars and farm machinery were destroyed.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC gave this an F3, Grazulis gives an F2.  SPC and NCDC give a path length of 7 miles, Grazulis and Storm Data give 8 miles.  SPC, Storm Data, and NCDC give a path width of 880 yards, Grazulis gives 800 yards.  The touchdown lat/lon listed by NCDC and SPC is in Hickman County, and the liftoff lat/lon is in Graves County (far western Kentucky).  Grazulis takes the tornado from two miles west of Adairville to Schochoh, which agrees with Storm Data.

March 25, 1964
Counties:  Franklin
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  10 yards
Path length:  1/10 mile
Time:  6:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  A small tornado demolished a barn and carried the barn timbers a half mile away from the barn site.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC/NCDC call this an F1, Grazulis says F2.  SPC gives a path length of 1/10 of a mile and a width of 10 yards...NCDC and Grazulis give nothing for either.  The lat/lon pair for this tornado listed by SPC/NCDC put it in southern Floyd County Indiana.  Grazulis lists the tornado in Franklin County but gives no location or path length.   If SPC/NCDC's lat/lon is changed from -85.92 to -84.92, it is placed in Franklin County.  More research would be nice, to confirm it's location and to get a better handle on path width and length.

March 25, 1964
Counties:  Jefferson KY, Shelby, Oldham, Henry
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries: 1
Path width:  30 yards
Path length: 
Time:  7:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  Skipped east-northeast from just east of Standiford Field to Smithfield and New Castle.  The "bounding" tornado, and accompanying high winds, unroofed or damaged four homes, 31 barns, and fifty other buildings.
Jefferson County:  The Jefferson County portion of the track was well-covered in the local newspapers.  The tornado touched down on the east side of Louisville International Airport at the intersection of Standiford Lane and Preston Highway, where it lifted and blew a car 40 feet, depositing it on its roof.  The tornado grew to about two blocks wide and tore the roof off of a home at 4503 Zeta Court, dropping it in the back yard.  Also on Zeta Court a car was flipped over.  At about the same time a truck was flipped over at 2420 Cavelle Avenue.   The tornado may have weakened or lifted slightly as the storm moved through Watterson Park and West Buechel.  Damage then occurred again when a frame home's garage was torn from its foundation at 2835 Klondike Lane and was thrown 100 feet into the side of Saint Martha Catholic Church.  On Dale Ann Drive a playhouse weighing 1500 pounds was blown 200 feet.  After causing comparatively little damage in Houston Acres, the tornado strengthened again and grew to a width of about three blocks.  On Cardwell Way a carport collapsed, three homes were damaged, and a car was demolished.  Meanwhile, siding was removed from a home at 58 Hallsdale Drive and a garage was destroyed next door at 60 Hallsdale Drive.  The tornado may have again weakened or lifted as the storm crossed Blue Ridge Manor and Anchorage.  The last damage report in Jefferson County was on Collins Lane where homes and commercial buildings were damaged, and roofs were removed from barns.  The head of the weather service office in Louisville, O. K. Anderson, surveyed the damage and said there was no doubt in his mind that it was a small, bounding tornado. Click here for a map of the Jefferson County portion of this tornado track.  Louisville newspapers did not mention any damage in Oldham or Shelby Counties.  There was mention of tornado damage in Smithfield and just outside New Castle in Henry County.
Noted discrepancies:  Grazulis does not include Shelby County.  NCDC does not list Oldham County or Henry County, and lists Jefferson County twice.  Storm Data lists only Jefferson and Henry counties.  SPC, Storm Data, and NCDC give a time of 7:00pm, Grazulis give 7:25pm.  SPC gives and endpoint lat/lon of 28.50/-85.12...NCDC give 38.22/-85.45.  SPC, Storm Data, and NCDC list one injury...Grazulis lists none.  SPC gives a path length of 38 miles, NCDC gives 33 miles, Storm Data says 40 miles, Grazulis lists a skipping path of 23 miles.  SPC gives a path width of 10 yards, NCDC 30 yards, Grazulis 40 yards.   The second of the two Jefferson County entries at NCDC lists the touchdown point with the exact same lat/lon as the liftoff point in the first Jefferson County entry.  Grazulis does mention that the tornado skipped.  The NCDC touchdown lat/lon in Shelby County is not the same as the liftoff lat/lon in Jefferson County, though it ought to be if the tornado went directly from Jefferson County into Shelby County as one coherent tornado, so perhaps at the NCDC website the Shelby County event is a separate tornado, and is also a separate tornado according to Grazulis who perhaps felt it was not F2 and thus omitted it...?  Grazulis takes the twister from Jefferson County into Oldham County (instead of Shelby County) and on into Henry County (agreeing with SPC's database).  The touchdown and liftoff lat/lon given by SPC/NCDC agree perfectly with Grazulis.  Using the touchdown and liftoff lat/lons at SPC, this tornado would have missed Shelby County.  The end lat/lon given by NCDC for Shelby County is actually located in Henry County.  Storm Data narrative says, "A small tornado of the bounding type moved in a straight line west-southwest to east-northeast from about half a mile east of Standiford Field...to approximately ten miles northeast.  Apparently the same tornado continued northeastward into Henry County.  It touched down several times in Jefferson County, and in Henry County...in the vicinities of Smithfield and New Castle."  More research is necessary.

March 29, 1974
Counties:  Hardin
F-scale:  F2
Deaths: 
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:45pm
Noted discrepancies:  SPC/NCDC list this as an F2, Grazulis does not list it. 

March 29, 1974
Counties:  Anderson
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  2
Path width:  100 yards
Path length:  2 miles
Time:  8:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  A trailer and a barn were destroyed at Lawrenceburg.  A home was unroofed, and other buildings were damaged.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC give a path length of 1 mile, Grazulis and Storm Data give 2 miles.

March 29, 1974
Counties:  Russell
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  9:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  A tornado destroyed two trailers and a barn, just north of Jamestown.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC give a time of 9:00pm, Grazulis and Storm Data five 10:00pm. 

March 12, 1975
Counties:  Barren
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  4:45am
Noted discrepancies:  None

March 20, 1976
Counties:  Barren
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  8:00pm
Noted discrepancies:  None

March 31, 1979
Counties:  Barren
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  1
Injuries:  19
Path width:  100 yards
Path length:  13 miles
Time:  4:25pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved southeast from three miles southeast of the intersection of I-65 and the Cumberland Parkway.  A child was killed when a concrete block grocery store caved in.  Two trailers, two cars, and ten barns were destroyed.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC rank this as an F3, Grazulis calls it an F2.  SPC and NCDC give a path length of 13 miles, Grazulis gives 12 miles, Storm Data says 8 miles.

March 16, 1982
Counties:  Clark KY (to Powell)
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  2
Path width:  400 yards
Path length:  8 miles
Time:  12:45pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved east from near Trapp, across Hidden Valley and Virden Ridge to the Black Creek area.  Four homes, four trailers, and many outbuildings were destroyed.
Noted discrepancies:  None

March 20, 1982
Counties:  Shelby
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:50pm
Noted discrepancies:  NWS ranks this as an F2...Grazulis does not list it.
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado touched down near where I-64 crosses the Jefferson/Shelby county line, moving on to the Governor's Manor Shopping Center in Shelbyville.  Will plot as such.

March 20, 1982
Counties:  Shelby, Franklin
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  200 yards
Path length:  20 miles
Time:  7:00pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved east-northeast from Southville to east of Waddy.  A dozen barns, two trailers, and several other buildings were destroyed in the Southville area.  Homes were struck in Waddy.
Noted discrepancies:  Grazulis ends this tornado just inside the Franklin County line, but SPC and NCDC take it all the way to Frankfort.  Storm Data has this tornado hit Southville,  KY 714, and Waddy.  Will plot with official lat/lon but additional research would be nice.
UPDATE:  On November 30, 2006 we received an e-mail from Steve Landers of Waddy, Kentucky.  He provided extremely useful information regarding the path of this tornado in Shelby County, based on damage he witnessed at the time.   Barns were destroyed on Hackworth Road, KY 395 (Waddy Road), and KY 1472 (Hickory Ridge Road).  A house was damaged on Hickory Ridge Road and trees were uprooted on KY 637 (Kings Highway).  The path has been changed to reflect Mr. Landers' information.  Mr. Landers does not recall any damage having occurred in Franklin County, so additional research is still necessary for that portion of the track.

March 10, 1986
Counties:  Washington IN, Scott IN
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  200 yards
Path length:  1 mile
Time:  2:10pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved northeast from one mile southwest of Little York to Austin.  Fifteen trailers were demolished, 75 homes and many barns were either heavily damaged or destroyed.  People were injured by flying debris.
Noted discrepancies:  None


March 10, 1986
Counties:  Nelson
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  4:00pm
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado touched down near Botland on Manton Road at the Carol Ballard Farm.


March 10, 1986
Counties:  Fayette
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  20
Path width:  100 yards
Path length:  3 1/2 miles
Time:  4:50pm
Notes:  This was one of the worst tornadoes ever to strike Lexington.  The tornado began in the vicinity of Tates Creek Road and Man O War Boulevard.  A barn was destroyed near the intersection of Wilson Downing Road and Tates Creek Road.  The twister traveled to the northeast, heavily damaging Gainesway, Southeastern Hills, and many neighborhoods along Man O War Boulevard before lifting at Richmond Road across the street from Saint Joseph East Hospital.  Park Hills Shopping Center was damaged, and Pimlico Parkway and Mammoth Drive were badly hit.  Roofs were torn off at Ak-Sar-Ben Park.  Overall, 845 homes were damaged, and 200 of them near-F3.  Heavy damage was seen on Green River Court and at 3576 Pimlico Parkway.  The roof at 3245 Mammoth Drive flew into the Park Hills Shopping Center, 1240 Ascot Park was badly damaged, and the houses at 3576 Bold Bidder and 1248 Ak-Sar-Ben Park were destroyed.  Somewhat lighter damage was noted on Personality Court, Sundart Drive, Centre Parkway, and River Park Drive in Gainesway.  A man at 3576 Bold Bidder broke his neck when a brick wall collapsed on him.  About 150 families required emergency shelter.  Originally, the head of the National Weather Service in Lexington, Jim Speray, claimed that the damage was done by a downburst rather than by a tornado, with winds of 100 to 200 mph.  He later changed his ruling to an F2 tornado.  Tornado expert Dr. Ted Fujita (or possibly students of his) surveyed the damage.  By coincidence, this was the date of the annual statewide tornado drill test.  Jim Barnes of 1448 Canonero Drive said he was grilling steaks in his driveway.  "When I flipped one of the steaks and it didn't come back down, I knew it was time to go inside."  Click here for a map of the tornado's path and damage pctures.  Streets that suffered damage (other than those listed above):  Atokad Park, Aztec Circle, Big Ben Court, Carlsbad Court, Carriage Lane, Custer Drive, Custer Lake Court, Dale Drive, East Hills Drive, Glacier Court, Golden Gate Park, Mount Rainier Drive, Packanack Court, Personality Court, Pipestone Court, Rocky Mount Court, Stephen Foster Drive, Shoal Lake Drive, Squires Circle, Squires Road, Tates Brook Drive, Travis Court, Tuscaloosa Lane, Woodview Drive, and Yosemite Circle.

March 12, 1986
Counties:  Hardin
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  4:40am
Notes:  Storm Data touches this tornado down at Eastview and hits KY 84.


March 12, 1986
Counties:  Nelson
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  5:10am
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado struck Hunters Lane, north of Bardstown.


March 12, 1986
Counties:  Nicholas
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:15am
Noted discrepancies:  SPC/NCDC lat/lon is actually in Robertson County.  Storm Data says the tornado touched down eight miles north of Carlisle on Ball Hill Road.  We have plotted it according to Storm Data.

March 29, 1989
Counties:  Grayson
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  50 yards
Path length:  7 miles
Time:  4:25pm
Grazulis narrative:  Moved northeast from the south side of Clarkson, just north of Big Clifty, to near the Hardin County line.  This skipping, hopping tornado destroyed four homes, six mobile homes, a church, five barns, and 12 other buildings.
Noted discrepancies:  None

March 22, 1991
Counties:  Logan, Warren (from Todd)
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  1
Injuries:  12
Path width:  400 yards
Path length:
Time:  5:50pm
Grazulis narrative:  Skipped northeast from 6 1/2 miles southeast of Trenton to southwest of Allensville to near Lickskillet to near Auburn and Richardsville.  Southeast of Trenton the tornado was on the ground for a mile and a half and destroyed a barn and a trailer.  Twelve homes were destroyed in the touchdown near Allensville.  Churches and a tied-down trailer were destroyed near Lickskillet.  An 11-year-old boy was killed in the trailer.  Several barns were destroyed farther to the northeast.
Noted discrepancies:  SPC and NCDC give a path length of 39 miles, Grazulis gives 45 miles, and Storm Data says 25 miles.

March 1, 1997
Counties:  Warren
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  4:26am
Notes:  Storm Data puts this tornado on Garrett Hollow Road.


March 1, 1997
Counties:  Monroe
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  4:36am
Noted discrepancies:  None


March 1, 1997
Counties:  Washington KY
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  11:59am
Noted discrepancies:  Storm Data puts this tornado on Lincoln Park Road.


March 1, 1997
Counties:  Hart
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  10:00pm
Notes:  Storm Data places this tornado near Hardyville.


March 1, 1997
Counties:  Metcalfe
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  11:25pm
Notes:  Storm Data puts this tornado near Center.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Hardin
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  5:45pm
Noted discrepancies:  Storm Data takes this tornado from Rineyville to Colesburg.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Hart, LaRue
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:  1
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:04pm
Noted discrepancies:  SPC/NCDC endpoint lat/lon for this tornado is in LaRue County, and narrative at NCDC includes LaRue County.  LaRue County is also included for this tornado at the NCDC website.  For this project this tornado was mapped all the way to the SPC/NCDC ending lat/lon in LaRue County.  Upon further investigation it appears that this tornado was split into two at SPC.  Storm Data says this twister touched down at Bonnieville in Hart County and moved to Magnolia in LaRue County before lifting.  Hammonville was struck.  The tornado crossed I-65 at Exit 71.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Nelson
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:15pm
Noted discrepancies:  None


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Green, LaRue, Marion
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  6:25pm
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado touched down in Creal, crossed KY 61, KY 2762, KY 210, entered LaRue County, hit Pleasant Ridge, entered Marion County, dissipating three miles west of Saint Joseph.  Cannot find Creal on any map.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Adair
F-scale:  F3
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:15pm
Noted discrepancies:  SPC lists the beginning and ending lat/lons as 36.88/-85.72, 37.03/-85.45...NCDC has 37.18/-85.32, 37.22/-85.08.  SPC lists a path length of 15 miles...NCDC says 10 miles.   The lat/lons and path lengths given here are the mirror image of the lat/lons and path lengths given in the next event.
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado touched down at Cane Valley and lifted around Pellyton.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Metcalfe, Adair
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:  1
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:15pm
Noted discrepancies:  SPC has beginning and ending lat/lons as 37.18/-85.32, 37.22/-85.08...NCDC has 36.88/-85.72, 37.03/85.45.  SPC has a path length of 10 miles...NCDC says 15 miles.  The lat/lon issue and path length issue here are the mirror image of the lat/lon issue and path length issue of the previous tornado.  End lat/lon takes this tornado into Adair County, which agrees with NCDC narrative.  Will plot into Adair County.  Storm Data lists this tornado as having struck both Metcalfe and Adair counties, touching down a mile west of Summer Shade at the intersection of KY 90 and Milam Clark Road, crossing KY 90 and KY 640, KY 163 south of Goodluck, lifting just north of Breeding.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Casey
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:40pm
Notes:  Storm Data places this tornado near Riffe and along a ten mile long path from one mile northwest of Dunnville to Gilpin.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Adair
F-scale:  F2
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:45pm
Noted discrepancies:  None


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Scott IN, Jefferson IN
F-scale:  F1
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:45pm
Noted discrepancies:  A straight line between the touchdown lat/lon and liftoff lat/lon would have the tornado scrape the northernmost tip of Trimble County...able to work around it though for plotting.
Notes:  Storm Data says this tornado touched down just east of Blocher and traveled to the north side of Madison from Shun Pike to Audubon Pike. 


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Russell
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  7:50pm
Notes:  Storm Data touched this tornado down near KY 55 and hits Middletown and Half Acre.


March 28, 1997
Counties:  Hart
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:
Injuries:
Path width:
Path length:
Time:  10:28pm
Notes:  According to Storm Data this tornado touched down near Seymour.

March 19, 2005
Counties:  Spencer
F-scale:  F0
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:
Path length:  1/4 mile
Time:  3:40pm
Notes:  This tornado struck Brier Hill.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Washington IN, Clark IN, Scott IN, Jefferson IN, Trimble
EF-Scale:  EF-4
Deaths:  11
Injuries:
Path width:  700 yards
Path length:  49 miles
Time:  2:50pm EST
Notes:  Washington County
The National Weather Service in conjunction with Washington County Emergency Management conducted a detailed tornado damage survey on Saturday, March 3. Below are the results.

The tornado first touched down on the south side of Fredericksburg just south of U.S. 150 where several trees were snapped off. In this area, winds were estimated to be 90 mph (EF1) with a damage width of 30 yards along the south fork of the Blue Lick River.

Additional tree damage was observed as the tornado moved east- northeast across farmland. Near the intersection of Horners Chapel Road and Fredericksburg Road, a high tension metal power structure was toppled along with numerous trees uprooted and snapped. Here, damage was estimated as EF2 with 130 mph winds. Along Palmyra Road near Strickland Road, several trees were snapped with EF1 damage 50-100 yards wide and estimated winds of 100-110 mph. High tension wires were down and trees snapped along West End Road just north of Shanks Hill Road.

The tornado then traveled over a ridge and intensified as it hit State Route 135 at Dutch Creek Road. Here, large chunks of 5- or 6-inch thick asphalt from an approximately 4-by-4-yard  section of roadway were blown 10 to 30 yards into the adjacent  grass next to the road. Just east of Route 135, tremendous tree  damage was observed. At this location, the tornado was estimated to be of EF3 strength with 150 mph winds. The width of the damage  path also began to widen, increasing to 200 yards.

Tree and structural damage was widespread northeast of Route 135 as the tornado crossed Trainer Lane and then State Road 335 to Robbs Lane. The width of observable damage increased to one-quarter to one-third of a mile. Countless trees were snapped and uprooted. The degree of damage suggested a mix of EF2 and EF3 damage in this area, with estimated winds of 120-150 mph.

The tornado crossed U.S. 60 just south of New Pekin. Immediately east of the highway, tremendous structural damage was observed. A well-constructed and large factory building (Airgo Industries) was cleared to its foundation slab with numerous anchoring bolts bent in the direction of the storm. Debris from this building was observed one-half to three-quarters of a mile downwind. Large power poles were snapped. Another metal out building on the right periphery of the damage path had sheeting pulled off the back of the building apparently from the force of the inbound winds into the tornado. This was the area where 5 people were tragically killed in a mobile home. In this location just east of U.S. 60, damage suggested an EF4 tornado with 170 mph estimated winds, and a width of observed damage from 0.3-0.4 mile.

Damage continued to the east along and south of Hurst Road in extreme southeast Washington County. The tornado crossed into extreme northwest Clark County along and near Daisy Hill Road. In this area, a well-constructed one-story brick house at the top of a small ridge was completely destroyed with no walls standing. People onsite reported that cows were missing and could not be located. They also stated that the tornado looked like a black wall as it approached. A heavy trailer cab was blown from this house to another demolished brick home about one-quarter mile away. Damage here suggested EF4 damage with 170 mph winds.

As the tornado re-entered Washington County near the intersection of Daisy Hill Road and Williams Knob Road, widespread damage occurred. This included a home which was totally leveled as well as a couple of anchored down double wide trailers. A car was destroyed and tossed about 100 yards in the direction of storm motion from its origin at the home. At one of the destroyed trailers, a Dodge Ram pickup truck was tossed onto its side and destroyed in the opposite direction from the car (i.e., on the left side of the tornado track). Here, EF3-EF4 damage was estimated with winds of 150-170 mph. There were also snapped trees and structural damage along Whiskey Run Road. The width of the observed damage straddling the Washington-Clark County line was estimated to be one-third to one-half mile wide, although the width of the most concentrated damage was narrower. The last observed damage in Washington County was near S. Flatwood Road in a wooded area before the tornado entered Clark County.

Across Washington County, particularly east of IN 135, thousands of trees were uprooted and snapped.

Clark County and Scott CountyThe National Weather Service in conjunction with Clark County Emergency Management conducted an exhaustive tornado damage survey on Saturday and Sunday, March 3 and 4. Below are the results. The tornado continued east-northeast in far northwest Clark County on Dan Gray Road where the twister leveled many well-built homes and caused extensive tree damage. The tornado here was rated EF4 with estimated wind speeds of 170 mph and a damage width of one-third mile.

The tornado moved into far southeast Washington County before reappearing in Clark County. In Clark, the damage width narrowed to one-quarter mile as the tornado crossed Pixley Knob Road and decreased in intensity to EF2 with wind speeds of 115-120 mph.

Farther east, the tornado intensified again as it destroyed two double wide homes on Speith Road. One family residence on the west side of the road was severely damaged, reflecting EF3 damage with 150 mph winds.

The tornado crossed Interstate 65, damaging several vehicles and semis and closing the interstate for several hours. Several people were trapped in these vehicles, but were later rescued.

The tornado continued to strengthen just east of Exit 19 of Interstate 65 in a heavily industrialized area. Here, buildings containing several businesses were severely damaged. A home was destroyed on the east side of North Fraucke Road. The violent tornado also seriously damaged several homes on the north side of State Highway 160. Here, there was evidence of multi-vortex structure with EF4 damage and 175 mph estimated winds.

The tornado then struck the south buildings of the Henryville middle and high school complex, with severe damage and 170 mph winds (EF4). The middle school experienced the worst damage. The cafeteria was completely destroyed. Two school buses were ripped off their chassis.

There was also extensive structural damage on the east side of Henryville on North Front Street and Pennsylvania Street. A high tension tower and other homes were damaged on Pine Drive. Incredible tree damage also occurred just west of Pine Drive as the tornado traveled up a ridge. In this region, the tornado was an EF3 with 150 mph winds.

On Brownstown Road, many homes were severely damaged especially on the north side of the tornado track with estimated speeds of 150 mph (EF3). Farther east, there was massive deforestation on the east side of a ridge just west of and along Henryville Otisco Road. Several more homes were severely damaged along this road. One of these homes reflected EF4 damage and 170 mph winds.

The tornado rapidly narrowed to a rope-like structure and ended as an EF1 with 90-95 mph winds and an 80 yard wide path. This occurred near the intersection of Blackberry Trail and State Highway 3.

Simultaneously, a new cyclic tornado vortex rapidly formed from the same supercell near Mahan Road and Old State Road 3 immediately southwest of the first tornado. The second tornado began as an EF1 and damaged a church and a few trees. The vortex quickly intensified to EF3 strength as it crossed the south portion of the town of Marysville, severely damaging several homes.

East of Marysville, another cyclic vortex from the parent storm formed just southwest of the intersection of Nabb New Washington Road and Nabb Marysville Road. This vortex intensified and merged with the primary circulation. The tornado severely damaged or destroyed several houses and double wide mobile homes around the intersection of Nabb New Washington and Nabb Marysville. Debris from the double wides was tossed around a mile downwind. The tornado was rated EF3 here with 150 mph winds and a damage width of one-third mile.

A Civil Air Patrol flight on Sunday, March 4 revealed extensive ground scouring in farmers` fields east of Marysville all the way to the Jefferson-Scott County line. This scouring was evidence of a multi-vortex tornado, which was confirmed by multiple videos and photographs.

The tornado continued north of Barnes Road, damaging several clusters of trees in open country. The tornado intensified east of the intersection of Kettle Bottom and State Highway 362.

In Scott County, immediately north of Highway 362 and east of Concord Road, three homes were severely damaged while five double wide mobile homes were completely destroyed. Here, the tornado was an EF4 with 170 mph winds. Just south of 362 in Clark County, two additional homes and power poles were damaged greatly. From there, the tornado crossed into Jefferson County, Indiana.

Jefferson County:  The National Weather Service in conjunction with Jefferson County, IN Emergency Management conducted the tornado damage survey in Jefferson County. The tornado traveled from Clark County, Indiana across extreme southeast Scott County and into far southern Jefferson County. Damage was observed along and just north of State Highway 362 near the 3-county line. This included several mobile homes totally destroyed, several framed houses heavily damaged, tremendous tree damage, and power poles snapped and shredded. The observed damage width was one-third of a mile with estimated winds of 170 mph (EF4).

The tornado traveled east-northeast snapping trees and power poles on County Road 850, and did its most significant damage at the intersection of Jackson Road, State Highway 62, and Swan Road about 2 miles south of the town of Chelsea.

In this area, several well-built brick homes were destroyed. The homes had anchor bolts attached to steel plates and a concrete foundation. One house was lifted and slid 65 yards off its foundation while mostly still intact. Another home was completely demolished and thrown downwind several hundred yards, within which there were 3 fatalities. The garage of this house was destroyed with one vehicle thrown 30 yards and another tossed 75 yards. A piece of farm equipment was thrown 200 yards as well. A third well-built brick home had its roof completely lifted and thrown over 300 yards downwind. Also, an above ground pool half filled with water was missing. Wind speeds in the area were estimated at 170-175 mph (EF4) with a damage width of one-quarter mile.

The tornado tracked to the north of Paynesville and south of Lee Bottom, extensively damaging forests in southern Jefferson County before crossing the Ohio River into Trimble County, Kentucky. The damage width narrowed in this area to only a couple hundred yards.

Trimble County:  The National Weather Service in conjunction with Trimble County Emergency Management conducted an extensive tornado survey in Trimble County.  The tornado crossed the Ohio River from Jefferson County, Indiana and narrowed to about 200 yards wide.  The tornado damaged a home on Rodgers Road, overturned two barns, and uprooted and/or twisted several trees.  This was consistent with EF1 damage and 105-110mph estimated winds.

At the same time a second vortex formed immediately adjacent to the first vortex and totally destroyed a barn on Rodgers Road and extensively damaged another.  This tornado also damaged a lot of rugged forested area before intersecting with the path of the first vortex near the confluence of Highway 1838 (Corn Creek Road, Highway 625, and Joyce Mill Road.  In this area the tornado was rated as an EF2 with 115 mph estimated winds.

Three single-wide mobile homes near the intersection of Joyce Mill Road and Highway 625 were destroyed along with tree damage and downed power lines and poles.  This was consistent with EF1 damage, 105 mph estimated winds, and a damage width of 75 yards.

No evidence of further damage was observed until Rawlett Lane, where some trees were snapped and uprooted.  There could have been damage in-between although the survey team was unable to access this area.  The tornado then struck two homes and a single-wide mobile home on New Hope Ridge Road (Highway 2870) about 1.5 miles west of Highway 421.  Here EF1 damage, 90 mph winds, and a path width of 50 yards were estimated.  The tornado lifted near this location.

March 2, 2012
County:  Clark IN
EF-Scale:  EF1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  60 yards
Path length:  6.5 miles (skipping)
Time:  3:30pm EST
Notes:  Photographs taken during a Civil Air Patrol flight corroborate interviews with residents along the damage path that there were intermittent touchdowns of a weaker tornado with the second supercell to pass over the area (see previous tornado).  The second storm, which pummeled the recently devastated area with hail up to the size of softballs, followed nearly the same path as the first supercell. At least three locations along the path of this storm support the occurrence of a tornado of EF-1 intensity, with maximum winds approaching 110 mph, an intermittent path length of 6.5 miles, and a damage path width of 60 yards.  The first observed damage was near Round Knob in the Clark State Forest. Damage was again observed along and west of Speith Road, 1/4 of a mile north of Henryville-Blue Lick Road just southwest of Henryville. Finally, the tornado lifted after doing damage from the south side of Henryville near Robyn Avenue to the east side of Henryville at the intersection of Highway 160 and Haddox Road.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Hancock, Breckinridge
EF-Scale:  EF-2
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  200 yards
Path length:  17.4 miles
Time:  2:38pm CST
Notes: 
Aerial photos were matched perfectly with radar signatures to determine that the initial start point of the tornado occurred 4.5 miles south southwest of Hawesville in Hancock County along route 2181. Vinyl siding was ripped off a home and small outbuildings were damaged. The tornado continued east across route 69 toward Cloverport, intermittently touching down and doing damage to small outbuildings. 4 miles west of Cloverport, additional minor damage was done to a group of homes along 2169. Minor damage to buildings occurred just on the western outskirts of Cloverport, then the tornado lifted over the town, touching down again less than a mile east of the community, where numerous hardwood trees were observed to be uprooted from aerial photos. All of the damage was consistent with EF-0 wind speeds between 70 and 80 mph.

The National Weather Service would like to thank volunteer general aviation pilots Mark Powers and Josh Kieffer for flying the damage path in N16NA and Austin Lassell for aerial photography. The pilots are associated with the Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators.

The tornado track continued at a residence on New Bethel Cloverport Rd. where 2 structures were destroyed. This damage is consistent with an EF-2 tornado and 110 to 115 mph winds. The tornado continued east to near B Flood road with additional structural damage consistent with EF-1 damage and 90 mph winds.

Tree damage continued along the path with additional EF-2 damage occurring at two chicken farms where a 200 yd long chicken barn was destroyed and hundreds of chickens were killed and/or lost. This is consistent with EF-2 damage and 120 mph wind. An additional smaller chicken coop also sustained damage at the end of Silas Miller Road, consistent with EF-1 damage.

The end of the path was surveyed east at Hwy 259 where another metal structure was damaged and several trees where downed. This damage was consistent with EF-1 damage and 90 mph winds.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Trimble
EF-Scale:  EF-3
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  75 yards
Path length:  3.4 miles
Time:  3:41pm EST
Notes:
The National Weather Service in conjunction with Trimble County Emergency Management and an aerial survey conducted by pilots from the Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators confirmed that a tornado touched down about 5 miles SSE of Milton, just west of the Milton volunteer fire station number 2 on Highway 421. This is just NE of the intersection of Hwy 2870 and 421. The tornado touched down at approximately 3:38 PM EST, and the initial damage included snapped and twisted trees just west of Hwy 421.

The tornado rapidly increased in intensity as it moved to the east, directly striking the Milton volunteer fire station number 2. The fire station was heavily damaged, with the collapse of rigid frames. A 4000 pound trailer (concession trailer) was moved 30 yards, while a Ford pickup truck was moved 60 yards. The tornado was 60 yards wide with wind speeds of 140 mph, indicative of EF-3 strength. The tornado tracked to the east with extensive damage of trees along Hwy 1226. The tornado weakened to an EF-1 at 871 Palmyra Rd. and at 2130 Palmyra Rd. and narrowed to about 50 yards. Witnesses describe this as a very narrow, skipping tornado. Pictures confirm this.

Witnesses saw one vortex coming down from the apparent wall cloud and quickly lifting before a new vortex came down nearby. On Culls Ridge Road, the tornado strengthened to an EF-3 once again with 140 mph winds. It damaged two homes with many exterior walls partially collapsing. The most significant damage here was an electrical transmission line which collapsed a metal truss tower and snapped several power poles in a path width of 70 yards. The tornado weakened from there to an EF-1 tornado, damaging trees as it crossed into Carroll County with wind speeds in far eastern Trimble County of 85-90 mph.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Trimble
EF-Scale:  EF-1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  100 yards
Path length:  2.7 miles
Time:  4:01pm EST
Notes: 
The National Weather Service in conjunction with Trimble County Emergency Management and an aerial survey conducted by pilots from the Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators confirmed that an EF-1 tornado touched down on Willard Wilson Road in southern Trimble county at 401 PM EST. At this location, the tornado destroyed a 30 by 60 foot old barn and a single wide home. Along with the destroyed homes, one large Oak tree was downed along with several other smaller trees. Further down on Willard Wilson road, another 30 by 50 foot barn was collapsed and a 400 pound 4-wheeler was moved 30 feet. Shingle damage occurred to a home in this location. The tornado moved east-northeast to Hi-Grove Hill Road where the strongest (100 mph) winds occurred. There was a very concentrated area of trees snapped, along with a gutter ripped off a house and power line down. Finally, the tornado traveled to
Carmon Creek Road where several hardwoods were snapped along with power lines down. This area is just northwest of the US 421 and I-71 junction near the Trimble/Henry county line.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Meade
EF-Scale:  EF-0
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  30 yards
Path length:  0.75 mile
Time:  4:02pm EST
Notes:  The National Weather Service in conjunction with Meade County Emergency Management has determined that an EF-0 tornado with maximum wind speeds of 75 mph briefly touched down just east of the Breckinridge/Meade county line in Meade county. The tornado was photographed from Ekron, looking southwestward. Aerial photos of damage were also taken by volunteer general aviation pilots Mark Powers and Josh Kieffer and aerial photographer Austin Lassell in aircraft N16NA. The pilots were associated with the Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators. Both the aerial photos and picture of the tornado relayed by the emergency manager were matched up with a radar signature indicating rotation. The tornado touched down near the Hill Grove and Guston area on the south side of U.S. 60, blowing a porch off the side of a house. A sign was also blown down at a business along U.S. 60.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Henry
EF-Scale:  EF-1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  40 yards
Path length:  0.25 mile
Time:  4:12pm EST
Notes:  The National Weather Service in conjunction with an aerial damage survey performed by pilots David Katz and Gary Katz and photographer Tom Boucher from the Kentuckiana Volunteer Aviators determined that an EF-1 tornado touched down in northern Henry county on Friday, March 2nd. A thin path of downed trees coincident with a circulation observed on radar was surveyed by the pilots. Numerous trees were uprooted near a pasture east of Port Royal-English Road.

March 2, 2012
Counties:  Warren
EF-Scale:  EF-1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  60 yards
Path length:  0.5 mile
Time:  4:06pm CST
Notes:  Straight line winds along and north of the supercell moving through Simpson County uprooted shallow-rooted hardwood and softwood trees and destroyed a tool shed on Evans Rd.  As it moved into Warren County, it damaged barn roofs and produced golf ball size hail which penetrated siding on numerous vinyl sided houses.  As it reached 961 east of Alvaton in Warren County, it spawned an EF1 tornado with winds estimated at 95 mph destroying a barn and tool shed.

March 23, 2012
County:  Jefferson, KY
EF_Scale:  EF-1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  70 yards
Path length:  2.5 miles
Time:  2:07pm EDT
Notes:  This tornado touched down just north of the intersection of Cedar Creek Road and Mount Washington Road, and lifted just northeast of the intersection of Cedar Creek Road and Long Rifle Lane.
  The most significant damage was done on Brook Chase Court, about in the middle pf the path.

March 23, 2012
County:  Shelby
EF_Scale:  EF-1
Deaths:  0
Injuries:  0
Path width:  50 yards
Path length:  2.25 miles
Time:  2:28pm EDT
Notes:  The tornado traveled mainly over plowed fields, but was witnessed by at least three people and did do some damage to farms.  Two barns were destroyed, two barns suffered significant roof and structural damage, and about two dozen trees were snapped or uprooted.


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