Figure 1: Damage Map of tornado track in far western St. Charles County on January 2nd, 2006.
Figure 2: Minor tree damage three tenths of a mile southeast of the intersection of Highways T and D in western St. Charles County. The tornado likely traveled across two open fields over this area (Viewing north).
Figure 3: The left side of this roof (sheet metal) from this shed was torn off and displaced over 100 yards to the northeast. The residence heard a 'loud freight-train like sound' as the tornado passed to the northeast around 300 AM in the morning. Several large limbs were torn from trees northeast of this shed.
Figure 4: Additional tree damage a quarter of a mile northeast of the shed (Viewing northeast).
Figure 5: Reflectivity image from WFO St. Louis (LSX) Doppler radar at 255 AM CST showing the supercell moving into western St. Charles county.
Figure 6: Storm-relative velocity image from WFO LSX Doppler radar showing two circulations. The second core circulation (#2) was responsible for spawning the weak tornado.
Figure 7: Refectivity image from WFO LSX at 300 AM CST showing the supercell over parts of eastern Warren and western St. Charles county.
Figure 8: Storm-relative velocity image from WFO LSX continuing to show both circulations. The second core circulation (#2) intensified as it traveled across Highway T and D. Delta-V magnitudes (strength of rotation) at the 1.5 deg elevation slice was near 100 kts while the 0.5 deg slice was near 85 kts at this time.
Figure 9: Damage Map of tornado track in St. Louis County on January 2nd, 2006.
Figure 10: Several large trees (including fir trees) were either snapped or uprooted south of the home and lying to the west or northwest. The forward side of the circulation was responsible for the tree damage (Viewing northwest).
Figure 11: Additional fir trees were uprooted and lying to the northwest (Viewing southwest).
Figure 12: This is a classic image of tornadic damage showing only the bottom quarter of a pine tree. The middle and upper part of the pine tree was displaced several yards to the north and northwest (Viewing northeast).
Figure 13: Some of the tree tops were severed by the small twister while sheeting from a nearby home was mangled within the tree (Viewing east).
Figure 14: Additional large pine trees were uprooted and lying to the northwest. This is one of many new power poles that replaced the original damaged poles (Viewing northeast).
Figure 15: Additional pine tree damage. (Courtesy A. Mark Friz)
Figure 16: Large pine tree uprooted and lying north over the driveway of the two story home (Viewing northeast). (Courtesy A. Mark Friz)
Figure 17: Reflectivity image from WFO LSX at 516 AM CST showing comma-shaped echo embedded within a larger line of storms over west county St. Louis.
Figure 18: Storm-relative velocity image at 516 AM CST showing a strong circulation west of the intersection of Manchester and I-270. Delta-V at 0.5 degree slice (700 ft agl) was 72 kts.
Figure 19: Reflectivity image from WFO LSX at 526 AM CST showing northeastward the comma-shaped echo.
Figure 20: Storm-relative velocity image at 527 AM CST showing the tornadic circulation near the intersection of Olive and Warson. The mesovortex was located along the southern part of the comma-head.

NWS
St. Louis, Missouri

Isolated Severe Event
January 2nd, 2006

Unseasonably warm and unstable air flooded Missouri and Illinois during the evening hours the first day of January, setting the stage for severe thunderstorms during the early morning hours of January 2nd, 2006. There were numerous reports of hail and damaging winds. Storm surveys uncovered two tornado tracks with these storms.

The first tornado of the event touched down over far western St. Charles County near the intersection of Highways T and D. This damage track was not a continuous track.

A second tornado touched down over western St. Louis County near and northeast of the intersection of Olive and Warson Roads. Two homes were damaged by the tornado. Minor roof damage occurred with one home while sheeting and windows were blown in with the second home. Tree and other debris showed a classic convergent damage pattern. The tornado at this location initially touched down around 525 AM CST. Witnesses experienced brief heavy rainfall and small hail then followed by a very short period of stillness then a freight-train (explosion) type sound for a few seconds.

Damage Map of tornado in western St. Charles Co. January 2nd, 2006
Tree damage
Minor shed damage

Minor tree damage

Radar image at 255 AM CST

Storm-Relative Velocity image at 255 AM CST

Radar image at 300 AM CST

Storm-Relative Velocity image at 300 AM CST

Damage Map of tornado in St. Louis Co. January 2nd, 2006

Tree damage

Additional tree damage

More tree damage

Even more tree damage

Uprooted trees

Additional pine tree damage

Tree uprooted near a house

Radar image at 516 AM CST

Storm-Relative Velocity image at 516 AM CST

Radar image at 526 AM CST

Storm-Relative Velocity image at 527 AM CST


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