Length of Service Awards for Cooperative Weather Observers

 


Ken Hottovy, Larry Ruthi and Joy Cudney (Photo by Jennifer Ritterling)

Joy Cudney, a cooperative weather observer of Trousdale KS, was presented with the Helmut E. Landsberg Award for 60 years of service on Monday, December 14th, by Larry Ruthi, Meteorologist in Charge for the National Weather Service in Dodge City.  Joy and her husband Ray took over the station in 1949 and have been recording precipitation data since then.  The station has been in the family since 1916 when it first started.  Joy became the primary observer when Ray passed away in 1995.

Cathy Baldwin, Bruce Baldwin, Larry Ruthi & J. Hayes Baldwin
Cathy Baldwin, Bruce Baldwin, Larry Ruthi and J. Hayes Baldwin (Photo by Jesse Lee)

J. Hayes Baldwin, a cooperative weather observer of Kalvesta, was presented with the Edward H. Stoll  Award for 50 years of service on Wednesday, December 16th, by Larry Ruthi, Meteorologist in Charge for the National Weather Service in Dodge City.  J. Hayes started the station back in 1959 and has been recording precipitation data since then.  In attendance for the presentation were Cathy Baldwin, daughter, Bruce Baldwin, son, Debbie Pugh, representative for Senator Pat Roberts, and Dennis Mesa, representative for Senator Sam Brownback.  Representatives from the National Weather Service in Dodge City included Jeff Hutton, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, Jennifer Ritterling, Meteorologist and Jesse Lee, Observing Program Leader.

Mary Cunningham
Mary Cunningham (Photo by Jesse Lee)

Cooperative Weather Observer Mary Cunningham of Wakeeney Kansas was presented with a 10 year length of service award on Tuesday, December 15th by Jesse Lee, Observing Program Leader for the National Weather Service from Dodge City KS.  Mary took over the cooperative station from her mother, Rose Doxon, in 1999.  The station has been in the family since 1975.  Mary records daily maximum and minimum temperatures and precipitation. 

The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Weather Observer Program has given scientists and researchers continuous observational data since the program’s inception more than a century ago.  Today, nearly 10,000 volunteer observers participate in the nationwide program to provide daily reports on temperature, precipitation and other weather factors such as snow depth, river levels and soil temperature.

Satellites, high-speed computers, mathematical models and other technological breakthroughs have brought great benefits to the nation in terms of better forecasts and warnings.  But without the century-long accumulation of accurate weather observations taken by dedicated volunteer observers, scientists could not begin to adequately describe the climate of the United States.

 

 

 

 



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