Moderate to Extreme Drought Conditions continued in nearly all of Indiana as of November 9.

The U.S. Drought Monitor released on November 11 indicated 95% of Indiana experiencing moderate to extreme drought conditions as of November 9.  This is unchanged from the Drought Monitor released on November 2.  Severe drought conditions included most areas along and south of U.S. Highway 36.  Extreme drought conditions persisted in much of south central Indiana southward to the Ohio River and into Kentucky.  Moderate drought conditions existed in nearly all areas north of U.S. Highway 36.  Normal to abnormally dry conditions prevailed only in 5% of the state located near Lake Michigan

Drought Items noted for the month of November...

The last issue of Indiana Weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report for 2010 released on November 1 indicated that 98% of the corn and soybean acreage had been harvested.  Soils remained very dry with 93% of the top soil and sub soil moisture rated short to very short.  Only 3% of the pastures state-wide were rated good.  Thirty per cent of the winter wheat was rated poor to very poor.  Farmers were concerned about possible hay shortages during the winter.

On November 12, U.S. Geological Survey gauging sites indicated virtually all rivers and streams in Indiana were at below normal levels.  Several small watersheds were at or near daily record low flow.  The lowest river level for the East Fork White, White and Wabash Rivers was in southwest Indiana.  In central Indiana, all Indianapolis water supply reservoirs and Monroe Lake remained at 2 to 4.5 feet below normal lake levels.

The National Drought Monitor for November 9 indicated at least D1 conditions or moderate drought conditions existed in nearly all of Indiana, D2 conditions or severe drought conditions in more than 50% of Indiana and D3 conditions or extreme drought conditions in nearly 15% of Indiana.

Lawns were dormant unless watered.  Fallen leaves were very dry and crumpled. 

Two wildfires continued to burn in 50,000-acre Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge on November 10.

A wildfire occurred in 12-acre woods between two housing additions near Pendleton on November 8.

At least two wildfires occurred on November 12.  One near Camp Atterbury and another on the south side of Bedford.

Burning bans existed November 12 in 55% of the Indiana counties.  The Indiana Department of Homeland Security has a map of all counties currently under some type of burning ban.

In a November 11 update, Indiana Forestry indicated that the 2010 fall fire season continued well above normal for fire occurrence and severity. Fires have been very problematic.  Many fires have taken several hours and many fire departments to control. Wildfires have been observed during the night.  This is unusual for Indiana.  Forest fire danger was at it highest point in southern Indiana. High fire danger persisted for much of south central Indiana including the counties of Owen, Greene, Martin, Lawrence, Brown, Monroe, Johnson, Morgan, Jackson,  Bartholomew, Jennings, Orange, Washington, Scott, Clark, Crawford, Harrison and Perry. Fires remain possible in northern Indiana, especially in the well-drained, sandier soils of northwest Indiana.

State officials continued a request for voluntary reduction of water usage by 10%-15% for large water volume users in Southern Indiana.  Indiana Department of Environmental Management reported a few water supply problems in southern Indiana that affected a couple of local businesses and small water utilities.  The agency, also, reported water levels in wells, lakes and streams lower than normal in southern Indiana.

Little precipitation had fallen in much of Indiana from October 27 through November 12.  Drought conditions will persist in much of central and southern into the end of November.

End of Drought Items for the month of November.

Total precipitation for 2010 at Indianapolis through November 12 was 27.55 inches or more than 8 inches (8.16 inches) below normal.  This is the 14th driest year on record at Indianapolis for the January 1 through November 12 periods.  Below is a comparison of precipitation at Indianapolis between this year and last year.  The top graphic is the year to date precipitation in 2010 and those for 2009 in the bottom graphic.  Precipitation went above normal during the spring of 2009, remaining anywhere from five to ten inches above normal for the rest of the year. Total precipitation through November 12 last year was 44.21 inches or nearly 17 inches more (16.66 inches) for the same period in 2010.  The last time the Indianapolis International Airport received more than 0.50 inches of rainfall was on July 28 when 0.80 inches fell.  The last time rainfall exceeded an inch was on June 22 when 1.64 inches fell.

2009 vs 2010 comparison

  

Latest Indiana U.S Drought Moinitor and Graphical Rainfall Depictions
Latest Drought Monitor - Click to Enlarge Recent 14 Day Rainfall - Click to Enlarge Recent 30 day rainfall - Click to Enlarge Recent 60 Day Rainfall - Click to Enlarge. Recent 90 Day Rainfall - Click to Enlarge
Recent Rainfall - Click to Enlarge Recent 14 Day Per Cent of Normal - Click to Enlarge Recent 30 Day Per Cent of Normal - Click to Enlarge. Recent 60 Day Per Cent of Normal - Click to Enlarge. Recent 90 Day Per Cent of Normal - Click to Enlarge.

Weekly Vegetative Health Now and in 2009
2010 Vegetative Health 2009 Vegetative Health 2009 Vegetative Health
Latest available Vegetative Health
(Colder colors represents better health). Map courtesy of Center for Satellite Applications and Research
2009 Vegetative Health same week
(Colder colors represents better health). Map courtesy of Center for Satellite Applications and Research
Vegetation Health Change from Last Year (Colder colors represents improved health). Map courtesy of Center for Satellite Applications and Research

 

Click here for the rainfall expected for the next 1 to 5 days.

 

Click here for the total amount of rainfall expected the next 3 days.

 

Click here for the morning update of the total amount of rainfall expected the next 5 days.

 

Click here for the evening update of the total amount of rainfall expected the next 5 days.

 

 

Grapical Temperature and Precipitation Outlooks
6-10 Temperature Outlook - Click to Enlarge 8-14 Day Temperature Outlook - Click to Enlarge 30 day Temperat;ure Outlook - Click to Enlarge 90 Day Temperature Outlook - Click to Enlarge.
6-10 Precipitation Outlook  - Click to Enlarge 8-14 Day Precipitation Outlook - Click to Enlarge 30 Day Precipitation Outlook - Click to Enlarge. 90 Day Precipitation Outlook - Click to Enlarge.

 

 

Below are related web sites...

Precipitation Analysis
http://water.weather.gov/precip/

Local weather and climate...
http://www.weather.gov/ind/

River information...

http://water.usgs.gov/waterwatch/

 

U.S. Drought Monitor...

http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/

 

Climate Prediction and Soil Moisture...

http://www.cpc.noaa.gov/

 

Fire Potential Information...

http://www.wfas.net/

 

Agricultural Information...

http://www.nass.usda.gov/in

 

Portions of this Story updated on Friday November 12 by the Indianapolis NWS Climate Team



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