The recent hot weather, and the major temperature change that's coming

A dome of hot air established itself over the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys during the first three days of September, above a parched surface suffering from drought conditions.  Scorching temperatures into the triple digits resulted. 

  September 1 September 2 September 3
Location High Temperature Record High High Temperature Record High Forecast High Record High
Bowling Green 99° 104°, 1943 101° 103°, 1913 101° 102°, 1925
Frankfort 95° 103°, 1932 97° 106°, 1953 98° 102°, 1953
Lexington 96° 101°, 1953 98° 100°, 1953 98° 100°, 1953
Louisville 100° 103°, 1953 101° 103°, 1953 102° 99°, 1953 and 1925

Below are graphs showing the actual high temperatures observed on September 1 and 2, and the forecast for September 3-9.  The dome of hot air will be replaced by a trough of much cooler air this coming week, plus there will be added cloudiness and shower activity as the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee move north.  High temperatures on Monday will probably be about 30 degrees cooler than what we see today!
 

Bowling Green September 2011 temperatures Frankfort September 2011 temperatures
Lexington September 2011 temperatures Louisville September 2011 temperatures



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