Thank you severe weather spotters!

The Milwaukee/Sullivan staff would like to extend a BIG THANKS to all severe weather spotters for their volunteer help during the 2010 severe weather season.  The information you provided helped us tremendously, so give yourself a pat on the back!  It's simply amazing what you do in the spirit of public safety!

Severe weather spotters come from all walks of life - Emergency Managers, law enforcement officials, fire fighters, other first-responders, amateur radio operators, and others from the general public.

Many of you have shared stories or pictures of severe storms that you experienced, or of the damage caused by the storms. Some of you have shared your short video clips of the storms.  All of this is appreciated and it makes our job easier!

We utilize your severe weather report in four basic ways...

1) Your report may trigger a severe thunderstorm warning, a tornado warning or a flash flood warning,

2) Your report is used to verify an existing warning - we search for severe weather events that occurred during the valid time of the warning.  This tells us whether the warning was needed, how accurate it was, etc.

3) Your report is reformatted into a message/product entitled Local Storm Report (LSR).  This LSR is sent to the news media, and also posted on our web site at:  http://www.crh.noaa.gov/product.php?site=MKX&product=LSR&issuedby=MKX.

4) Your report is combined with others to produce a storm summary that is posted within our Storm Data publication.  This is done about 45-60 days after the end of any given month.  The publication serves as an official, legal source for severe weather information.  You can look at this publication at the bottom of our SkyWarn page:  http://www.crh.noaa.gov/mkx/?n=spotters.  Here is another link for Storm Data: http://www4.ncdc.noaa.gov/cgi-win/wwcgi.dll?wwEvent~Storms

We look forward to seeing you at one of our severe weather spotter classes this spring!   Last year, 2332 people attended our spotter classes in south-central and southeast Wisconsin!  In general, you don't have to be a spotter in order to attend these classes - education doesn't hurt you.  We've had over 2000 attendees each year from 2005 through 2010.

From 1994 through 2010, we've conducted 698 severe weather spotter talks for 32,452 people in our County Warning Area of south-central and southeast Wisconsin!  During this time period, we picked up 12,223 new severe weather spotters!  Wow!

Our 2011 severe weather spotter class schedule will be posted in our Top News of the Day section on our web site, as well as on our SkyWarn page, by February1, 2011.

To find out how many severe weather events have occurred in your Wisconsin county for the period of 1982 - 2009, click on this link.

Last, but not least, we would appreciate your taking and reporting snow measurements during the 2010-11 winter season.  Thank you!



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