April 2009 Wyoming Spring Snowmelt Flood Potential Outlook--LAST outlook

High Snowmelt Flood Potential for:   


...Portions of the Little Snake River Basin (from Savery to Baggs)...

Moderate - High Snowmelt Flood Potential for:  

...Little Goose Creek , Piney Creek, Clear Creek, North Fork Crazy Woman Creek, Clear Creek, and Middle Fork Powder River (affecting Big Horn, Story, Buffalo, Kaycee, and Sussex)...

...The Upper North Platte Basin…to include the Encampment River (affecting Encampment, Riverside, and Saratoga)...

Moderate Snowmelt Flood Potential for:


...Laramie Headwater Basins (up to Laramie)...

...Lower Wind River Basin (including the Middle Fork Popo Agie) (affecting Lander and Riverton)...

...North and South Forks of the Shoshone River
(affecting Buffalo Bill State Park)...

...Upper Portions of the Salt River Basin...

Snow water equivalents (SWEs) over the mountains of the Little Snake, Tongue, and Powder Watersheds have continued to have well above normal through the middle of April.  The mountain snowpack along the Little Snake Drainage continued to have 130 percent of normal SWEs by the middle of April.  The Laramie and the Upper North Platte Watersheds had above normal SWEs by mid-April. 

Notably, the Lower Wind River Basin's current SWEs have also increased to above normal by early April. 

All other headwater basins in Wyoming had near normal to just below normal SWEs by the mid-April.


The April updated spring 2009 snowmelt flood potential outlook calls for a
high potential for headwater snowmelt flooding across the Little Snake Basin--from Savery to Baggs.  A moderate-high snowmelt flood potential is expected for headwater locations along the Powder, Tongue and Upper North Platte Watersheds--to include the Encampment River.  A moderate snowmelt flood potential is foretasted for headwater locations along the Laramie Watershed, the lower reaches of the Wind River Basin (including the Middle Fork Popo Agie River), the North/South Forks of the Shoshone River, and upper portions of the Salt River. All other headwater locations across Wyoming can expect a generally low potential for flooding due to springtime snowmelt.

Note:  A much higher flood potential can occur at any location during periods of:
   1)  Higher than normal temperatures occurring during snowmelt.
   2)  Extended heavy rainfall occurring over a melting snowpack.


--This will be the LAST Outlook---please look for Flood Watches/Warnings from the Riverton, Cheyenne, and Billings NOAA offices--if conditions warrant--

 



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