Medicine Lodge Recognized as First StormReady State Park

Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site was recently recognized as the first StormReady® Wyoming state park or historic site at a ceremony held at Medicine Lodge on Wednesday, May 30.  WFO Riverton Warning Coordination Meteorologist Chris Jones made opening remarks and presented a recognition letter and certificate to Medicine Lodge Superintendent Brooks Jordan.

Superintendent Jordan was the project leader for ensuring Medicine Lodge met all necessary requirements for StormReady® designation.  WFO Riverton Meteorologist in Charge Kevin Lynott presented Superintendent Jordan with two StormReady® recognition signs for display at the park.  Others in attendance for the ceremony included Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, and Trails (SPHST) Administrator Domenic Bravo, SPHST Region 3 Manager Mike Allen, Big Horn County Emergency Manager John Hyde, and Washakie County Emergency Manager Kimball Croft.

 Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site Superintendent Brooks Jordan (second from left) is joined by, from left, Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites, and Trails (SPHST) Region 3 Manager Mike Allen, Wyoming SPHST Administrator Domenic Bravo, and WFO Riverton MIC Kevin Lynott at the StormReady® presentation.
Click on the thumbnail images for a larger view.
 Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site

Medicine Lodge State Archaeological
Site Superintendent Brooks Jordan
(second from left) is joined by, from left,
Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites,
and Trails (SPHST) Region 3 Manager
Mike Allen, Wyoming SPHST Administrator Domenic Bravo, and WFO Riverton MIC
Kevin Lynott at the StormReady® presentation.

  Medicine Lodge State Archaeological Site near Hyattville.

Medicine Lodge, a small state park along Medicine Lodge Creek in northern Wyoming, averages approximately 20,000 visitors each year. The park is nestled in a location that is prone to strong summer thunderstorms with outflow wind and lightning the primary hazards. Another threat to Medicine Lodge is spring snowmelt flooding. In 2011, flooding caused by melting of an historic snowpack in late June caused rapid rises along the Medicine Lodge Creek. The flooding prompted nighttime evacuations of campers as the water spilled across roads and campsites.

Working with the NWS, Superintendent Jordan developed improved communication methods to ensure park staff can be reached any time, day or night, to be notified of impending hazards. He also enhanced site communications to provide improved distribution of weather hazards information to visitors in the park. WFO Riverton Forecaster Kelly Allen in conjucntion with Superintendent Jordan developed an informative site-specific weather safety guide that is now distributed to park visitors.



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