February 2008 Climatic Summary


February temperatures were slightly below normal, averaging 1 to 2 degrees below normal. Sundance, in northeast Wyoming, was the warm spot averaging 0.8 degrees above normal. The cold spot was Newell where temperatures averaged 5.2 degrees below normal.
Precipitation in January was near normal. The wettest areas were across the Black Hills and northeast Wyoming where precipitation averaged 125 to175 percent of
normal. The driest areas were across the plains of western South Dakota where precipitation was 50 to 75 percent of normal, and several locations saw less than
30 percent of normal precipitation. The wet spot was at Wright 12W in northeast Wyoming where precipitation was 200 percent of normal, while Ardmore 2N was
the dry spot with only 15 percent of normal precipitation. The precipitation surplus for the month averaged 0.03 inches.
Snowfall in February was 15 to 25 percent above normal.  Snowfall averaged 2 to 3 feet across the northern Black Hills and Bear Lodge mountains.  On the northeast Wyoming plains snow averaged 6 to 12 inches with 3 to 8 inches on the plains of western South Dakota and in the southern and central Black Hills.

February storm summary...

On February 3 and 4 a low pressure system moved across the region bringing snow to western South Dakota and northeast Wyoming mainly north of I-90, where snowfall
averaged 2 to 4 inches.

On February 9 through 11 a series of upper level disturbance brought periodic snow to the region. The heaviest snows occurred in the northern Black Hills where 8 to 16 inches fell with 5 to 10 inches in the Bear Lodge mountains. On the South Dakota plains northwestern and south central areas saw 3 to 6 inches, with less than 2 inches on the central plains and across the southern and central Black Hills and southwestern areas.

On February 13 a weak storm system brought 1 to 3 inches of snow to northeast Wyoming and the northern Black Hills.

On February 17 and 18 an upper level storm system brought 10 to 15 inches of snow to the northern Black Hills and Bear Lodge mountains, with 1 to 3 inches on the plains of northeast Wyoming. Elsewhere in the Black Hills and on the South Dakota plains snowfall was an inch or less.

On February 24 and 25 another upper level storm system brought 3 to 5 inches of snow to the northern Black Hills and Bear Lodge mountains, with less than an inch falling on the southern and central Black Hills, and on the plains of northeast Wyoming and western South Dakota.

LOCAL EXTREMES

Temperature Data Rapid City   Lead   Gillette  
  Temperature Date Temperature Date Temperature  Date
Maximum Temperature 56 degrees 28th 48 degrees 22nd, 23rd 50 degrees 29th
Minimum Temperature -1 degrees 5th, 9th, 10th -10 degrees 10th -5 degrees 10th
             
Precipitation Data Rapid City   Lead   Gillette  
Monthly  Data Amount Data Amount Date Amount Date
Precipitation 0.51 inches   2.17 inches   0.61 inches  
Snowfall 6.2 inches   41.9 inches   7.0 inches  
             
Daily Data            
Maximum Precipitation 0.24 inches 11th 0.65 inches 11th 0.26 inches 28th
Maximum Snowfall 2.4 inches 11th 12.0 inches 11th 3.0 inches 4th

REGIONAL EXTREMES

Temperature Data   Western South Dakota     Northeastern Wyoming  
  Temperature Site Date Temperature Site Date
Maximum Temperature 58 degrees
58 degrees
Ardmore 2N
Winner
29th
29th
52 degrees Colony 29th
Minimum Temperature -18 degrees Hoover 6th -14 degrees Devil's Tower 5th
             
Precipitation Data   Western South Dakota     Northeastern Wyoming  
Monthly Data Amount Site Date Amount Site Date
Maximum Precipitation 2.17 inches Lead   1.02 inches Devil's Tower  
Minimum Precipitation 0.08 inches Ardmore 2N   0.36 inches Dillinger  
Maximum Snowfall 41.9 inches Lead        
Minimum Snowfall 1.3 inches Edgemont        
             
Daily Data            
Maximum Precipitation 0.66 inches Deadwood 2NE 11th 0.31 inches Devil's Tower 4th
Maximum Snowfall 12.0 inches Lead 11th 4.5 inches Upton 14ENE 12th

MONTHLY RECORDS

LOCATION DATE NEW RECORD OLD RECORD  DATE
    NO RECORDS SET    


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