March 2013 Climatic Summary
 
March temperatures across the entire region were around 2 degrees below average for the month. Locations across south central South Dakota were cooler, around 3 to 4 degrees below average, while parts of Northeast Wyoming were closer to average. The location with the coolest departure from average was Wood, which was -4.5 degrees below normal, while the location with the warmest departure was Gillette, at 0.2 degrees above normal.
 
Precipitation in March averaged around 53 percent of normal across the entire area.  The wettest and snowiest areas were over the northern and central Black Hills, and across south central portions of South Dakota, where 85 to 130 percent of normal precipitation was reported. The driest areas were across parts of Northeast Wyoming, and the northwestern and west central South Dakota plains, where precipitation averaged 12 to 40 percent of normal. Newell reported only 0.12 inches of precipitation for the month, which was only 12% of average for March. South central South Dakota received 0.75 to 1.50 inches of precipitation for the month.
 
Snowfall averaged around 74% of normal across the area, with most locations picking up 2 to 8 inches. Snowfall was the heaviest over the northern and central Black Hills, where 1 to 2 feet of snow fell for March. It was snowy across south central South Dakota, where 10 to 16 inches fell during the month. The highest snowfall totals were in Lead, where 25.4 inches of snowfall was observed.
 
March storm summary...
 
March 3-4th - A strong low pressure system moved out of the Northern Rockies and into the Northern Plains, bringing strong winds to much of the area, and some snow to Northeast Wyoming and the Black Hills area. Wind gusts from 45 to 65 mph were recorded across Northeast Wyoming and Northwest South Dakota. Several inches of snow fell across the northern Black Hills area.
 
March 9th – Another strong low pressure system moved out of the Central Rockies and clipped the southern part of South Dakota as it moved east. Some light freezing rain/drizzle fell across south central South Dakota early in the morning, and was followed by 4 to 12 inches of snow.
 
March 16th – A very narrow band of heavy snow fell across portions of the central Black Hills, through the Rapid City area, and east into the Badlands. Snowfall amounts of 4 to 7 inches were observed.
 
March 17th – A brief but strong wind event occurred across the South Dakota Plains late in the afternoon and early evening. Many locations experienced 50 to 70 mph wind gusts for a short period of time.
 
March 22nd – A localized weather disturbance crossed the Black Hills area, producing several inches of snowfall in a short period of time. Most locations reported 2 to 6 inches of snowfall, but a narrow corridor from Keystone and Hill City, north to the Silver City and Nemo areas reported 10 to 12 inches of snowfall.
 

LOCAL EXTREMES
Rapid City
Lead
Gillette
Temperature
Temperature
Date
Temperature
Date
Temperature
Date
Max. Temp.
72
14th
59
14th
69
14th
Min. Temp.
8
24th
2
25th
-3
25th
Precipitation
Rapid City
Lead
Gillette
Monthly Data
Amount
Date
Amount
Date
Amount
Date
Precipitation
0.69
 
1.87
 
0.30
 
Snowfall
11.8
 
25.4
 
2.1
 
Daily Data
Amount
Date
Amount
Date
Amount
Date
Max. Precipitation
0.29
16th
0.46
22nd
0.11
22nd
Max. Snowfall
5.8
16th
7.5
22nd
1.0
22nd

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